Weekly readings – 5th April 2020

Colonial-era Nile river treaties are to blame for the unresolved dispute over Ethiopia’s dam

Lessons from Italy’s Response to Coronavirus

Covid-19 impact on retail

How Apple is working from home

Source: Visual Capitalist

Phone companies are required to take measures to combat robocalls

Howard Marks’ new note

Why Germany’s Coronavirus Death Rate Is Far Lower Than In Other Countries

Work from home productivity data

A story of how Microsoft struggled to get Skype to be competitive in the communication app world

How WHO Became China’s Coronavirus Accomplice

Google released Community Mobility Reports of areas and countries around the world as folks are staying home amid the threat of Covid-19

Today I learned – Japanese earthquake resistant architecture

Earthquake is a part of life in Japan. To adapt the inevitable presence of earthquakes, the Japanese have come up with ingenious, intelligent and skillful ways to make buildings and architecture as earthquake-resistant as possible. It’s amazing that they could build wooden structures hundreds of years ago and they are still standing strong today, despite countless shakings over time. The idea is itself remarkably admirable, but the craftsmanship that goes into building constructions is truly outstanding. Smaller models took years to be built. Wooden pieces were crafted by hands so that they could slot into one another without nails. Concrete is checked and poured carefully to have the perfect spread. I was overwhelmed with admiration for the Japanese folks while watching the genius at work. Highly recommend this eye-opening clip

Drive To Survive Season 2 is a surprisingly good series

I am an F1 fanatic. I have been following the sport for more than 10 years. I also wrote about it multiple times on this blog. Personally, Formula 1 appeals to me with its unpredictability and its “nerdiness”. A lot of elements go into a race weekend, including top class engineering, data analytics that powers strategy and a split-second decision to deal with the changing elements in a race. Despite having races in 21 countries in the world, I feel that somehow it’s still a foreign sport to many. Not a whole lot of folks that I know follow the sport. Those who do developed a strong love for it like I do.

That’s why I was pretty excited about Drive To Survive Series – Season 2 by Netflix. To be honest, I didn’t watch the first season because my favorite team, Ferrari, and its rival- Mercedes, weren’t featured. The 2nd season showed that the streamer was given an unprecedented access to the paddock and teams. Cameramen followed drivers and team principals to their personal homes. Behind the scene footage where access was normally restricted was available. Folks who were interviewed gave answers that would have made significant headlines had they been published at the time. Watching it made me miss F1 even more than I do now. Like all other sports, F1 has been put on hold because of COVID-19

I do think that the series will bolster the popularity of F1 globally. I have seen positive reviews on Twitter regarding the 2nd season. If you run out of favorite shows to watch, I highly recommend it.

Today I learned – 29th March 2020 – How vaccines are made

This short video clip offers a great deal of information on how our body fights intrusion and harmful pathogen. The pace and the narrative are a little fast, but the infographics definitely aids audience’s understanding

It’s pretty interesting to learn that vaccines are created out of chicken eggs, the method responsible for 90% of our current vaccines

According to this representative from Sanofi, it takes, on average, 6 months to create a successful vaccine, starting from the time an egg enters a lab to the time a vaccine delivered to a customer

This clip details steps taken by scientists to grow viruses in an egg

Weekly readings – 28th March 2020

2020 economic apocalypse for small businesses

How WeChat, TikTok and Chinese Consumers Are Disrupting and Personalizing Luxury

Traffic and Pollution Plummet as U.S. Cities Shut Down for Coronavirus

How South Korea Solved Its Acute Hospital-Bed Shortage

A critical and accurate (imo) critique of a medium blog post that was deceptive, yet went viral.

JP Morgan’s research on small business cash liquidity

UK Tech for a changing world

How Spanish flu helped create Sweden’s modern welfare state

Why don’t we just ban targeted advertising?

Buying During a Crisis

Yearbook on Venture Capital in the US

How 3M Plans to Make More Than a Billion Masks By End of Year

Uplifting COVID-19 stories

I want to share with you some uplifting stories that put a smile on my face in this troubling time. I hope they will do yours as well.

A landlord in Wisconsin reduced April’s rent to $100 for his tenants

KETV-TV
Source: ketv

How Czech Republic got everyone to wear masks

Pandemic creates an inflection point

There is no need to talk about the havoc that this pandemic has brought on to our society. Everybody in the world should all feel it now. Terrible as it is, the pandemic presents an opportunity for us to look at the issues that we overlook in normal times

Paid sick leave

The US is one of the only few, if not the only country, where citizens don’t get paid sick leave. When there is a risk of a wide-spreading pandemic, the lack of this benefit forces workers to go to work even though they may be sick; which increases the threat of a spread. After this catastrophe blows over, perhaps it is time for us to bring this issue to the national spotlight and to pressure lawmakers into taking actions

Stock buybacks and corporate bailouts

The fact that corporations are asking for a big bailout after years of continuous stock repurchases and lucrative executive compensation is inexcusable and intolerable. While there is a case to be made that bailouts chop off a body part to save the body and corporations should be forced to return the money once healthy again, it doesn’t make it right the fact that tax payers’ money is used to bail out companies whose failure to prepare for a macroeconomic risk is the executives’.

Regulations over gig economy

For months, gig economy companies such as Lyft and Uber have fought regulations that would require them to treat workers as employees. What that means is that workers would be entitled to healthcare insurance, paid leave and other benefits that white-collar workers usually enjoy. Some folks I saw on Twitter, most from Silicon Valley, even blasted the regulations. However, a study by The Hustle may change perspectives on this. According to The Hustle, 57% of the surveyed drivers would still drive because that’s the only way to make ends meet. Some are not even making enough to pay for their rented vehicle. Furthermore, the lack of health insurance means that they and their family are vulnerable than ever. In light of this crisis and the impact on gig economy workers, is asking for a well-designed regulation to protect workers too much to ask?

Source: The Hustle

Healthcare system

The lack of tests in the US, compared to what is going on in other countries, is seriously shocking. Ask any American and it’s very likely that you will get told that the US has the most advanced healthcare system in the world. That’s true…for rich people and for very sophisticated treatments. However, when it comes to healthcare for ordinary folks and normal ailments, there is a lot to be desired for in the US. The country had disappointingly managed to fail to deliver a universal healthcare solution even before the pandemic broke. Now, the case cannot be made even more pressing. Recently, it’s reported that a woman was hit with a $35,000 bill for COVID-19 treatments and tests. How was that acceptable? It could happen and bankrupt any of the middle class Americans, or, worse, paycheck-to-paycheck folks.

Work from home

This one is polarizing. Proponents of WFH must be ecstatic to make their case when essentially everybody is required to work remotely now. On the other hand, some will experience cabin-fever, frustration and the drop in productivity. Personally, I prefer going to the office. I prefer meeting my colleagues face-to-face and have a setting that helps me focus on my work more than my comfortable home.

Furthermore, WFH presents an opportunity to test a company’s infrastructure. For most of last week, my colleagues and I experienced a laggy and slow connection. Even though home internet bandwidth can contribute to the issue, it’s undoubtedly our company’s network being not set up for a spike in traffic. Additionally, mass remote working can change how managers keep staff productive and keep track of their work.

Personal finance and change in lifestyle

Many of us now face, if you haven’t already, layoff or a drop in salary as companies are downsizing to survive the pandemic. Income may dry up, but the bills will still be there. Without a fund for a rainy day like we are going through, a financial struggle or bankruptcy is likely. The 11-year bull market since the 2009 crisis which many didn’t experience makes folks become complacent. After this COVID-19 disaster, it’s a great time to ponder hard decisions and establish sensible personal finance practices.

This is a scary and confusing time. But what happens in the next few months will be very interesting as decisions are to be made.