Weekly reading – 6th February 2021

What I wrote last week

My summary of Microsoft’s latest earnings, a giant with growth momentum

My estimate on Azure revenue

Bezos is stepping down (not really a shock), but Amazon is in a great shape

Business

I don’t always agree with all Ben’s takes, but his presentation here is pretty well-done

The NYTimes looked at the current infrastructure for electric vehicles which are becoming a force in the near future

It seems that Amazon’s struggles with its Game Studio come from the top

Apple in 2020: The Six Colors report card

A profile on Kaishou

The Facebook Oversight Board’s First Decisions: Ambitious, and Perhaps Impractical. A pretty good writeup on the first 5 decisions by the FOB. I think it’s great that the FOB came out swinging to prove at least up to now it’s not for show and it’s for business. It’s also great that it doesn’t put too much weight on the operationability of its decisions. That way, the decisions seem more dialogic and as a guide instead of being contaminated by expenses and profits.

Forbes’ writeup on Chegg, a subscription company that lets you solve your homework with the help of an army of experts from India. Every business needs to make money. That I can understand. But if somebody comes out and says that it encourages cheating, they also have a point.

A story on the implosion of Ample Hills, which was once Brooklyn’s hottest ice cream brand

The latest investment letter from RGA

What I found interesting

A professional photographer took incredible photos of the glaciers in Alaska, using iPhone 12 Pro Max

Have a look at an interesting mushroom farm in Vietnam

The ridiculous lack of understanding on Section 320 from lawmakers doesn’t seem limited to Republicans because Democrats have it too

An interesting piece on Arthur Hayes, the founder of BitMEX

Interesting stats

Another horrifying story about the US healthcare. I can’t believe what I read. A new parent had to deal with their newly born child being sick and the insurance company relied on red tape and the flaws of the system to exploit their customers. Imagine the horror of receiving a $270,000 bill.

US Distilleries made $31 billion in revenue in 2020, due to Covid-19. Premium liquor rose in popularity among consumers

In 2020, nearly 1 million Gen-Zers opened a trading account at Apex Clearing, most likely through a broker, with the average age of 19.

App downloads in January 2021 from Bank of America

Someone compiled data on customers for Fintech firms

Zelle processed more than $300 billion in 2020