Weekly readings – 19th October 2019

Amazon published their official position on a few social issues

Global electric car sales and market share, 2013-18

Source: IEA

The poor in America pay a higher tax rate than the rich. I guess the tax cut is doing what it is supposed to? (I am being sarcastic)

TurboTax’s decade-long war to prevent Americans from filing taxes online for free. I was angry when I read this article. Billions of hours and dollars are wasted every year on filing taxes and only a handful of people benefit at the expense of millions

To buy a phone in China, a face scan will be required as of 1st December 2019

Bob Iger’s massive bet on Disney’s future.

Sleep Deprivation Shuts Down Production of Essential Brain Proteins. The sleep deprivation pandemic is real in our society and there doesn’t seem to be signs of its abating.

How Amazon is redefining the expensive and wasteful process of returns

Boeing lead pilot warned about flight-control system tied to 737 Max crashes, then told regulators to delete it from manuals. Frankly, this is just disgusting. Boeing is one of the two plane manufacturers that dominate the sky and it still has this kind of behavior

Philosophical approaches in ethical decisions

The first course I took in my MBA was Business Ethics. One of the biggest lessons that I took from the course is that there are essentially three philosophies in ethical decisions

  1. Focus on Consequences (Consequentialist Theories): With this approach, decision makers focus more on the possible consequences. In other words, the ends matter more than the means
  2. Focus on Principles, Duties (Deontological Theories): with this approach, principles and abstract values matter the most in decision making. The question of “what is the right thing to do here?” is a major consideration
  3. Focus on Integrity (Virtue ethics): this approach focuses on the person trying to be a good person more than the act

Recently, there have been an increasing number of disputes between China and American businesses. American companies have to cave to pressure from the Chinese government when it comes to sensitive issues related to their sovereignty and politics. For instance, Apple hides the Taiwanese flag when users are in Hong Kong or Macau, and pulls the app that supports the protest in Hong Kong from App Store, even though it originally approved the app.

China is a huge market for Apple and houses the majority of its supply chain. In the beginning, they tried to do the right thing. Eventually, Tim Cook and the management team prioritized the consequences of his decision, thinking about the impact on the company’s financials, shareholders and to some extent his own bonus, I think.

I don’t think it’s clear cut to say an approach is right or wrong. It varies from one person to another, from one system of values to another. Personally, I would prefer seeing Apple keep the app on the App Store, but I understand the decision as well as I understand the decisions taken by other companies under China’s pressure.

Disclaimer: I own Apple’s stocks in my portfolio

Weekly readings – 24th August 2019

Spotifyโ€™s pitch to podcasters: valuable listener data

Netherlands’ Building Ages. How cool is this? It must have taken quite some time and effort to build this map.

OuiWork? The quick case for WeWork as an actually disruptive business

Apple Targets Apple TV+ Launch in November, Weighs $9.99 Price After Free Trial

Where Top US Banks Are Betting On Fintech

Manufacturers Want to Quit China for Vietnam. Theyโ€™re Finding It Impossible

Appleโ€™s New TV Strategy Might Just Work

MoviePass database exposes 161 million records. Much as I am grateful to MoviePass, perhaps it’s time for the company to be shut down

Starbucks, monetary superpower. Let me give you a notable quote to get an idea of what this article is about

Starbucks has around $1.6 billion in stored value card liabilities outstanding. This represents the sum of all physical gift cards held in customer’s wallets as well as the digital value of electronic balances held in the Starbucks Mobile App.* It amounts to ~6% of all of the company’s liabilities. 

This is a pretty incredible number. Stored value card liabilities are the money that you, oh loyal Starbucks customer, use to buy coffee. What you might not realize is that these balances  simultaneously function as a loan to Starbucks. Starbucks doesn’t pay any interest on balances held in the Starbucks app or gift cards. You, the loyal customer, are providing the company with free debt. 

Now bigger than eBay, Shopify sets its sights on Amazon

Inside Indiaโ€™s Messy Electric Vehicle Revolution

China’s Mega Projects Series

This series on China is pretty amazing. It covers important, strategic and ambitious projects that the neighboring country of us Vietnamese has been working on.

It is understandable to compare Vietnam to China. There are a lot of similarities shared between the two countries in terms of history, culture, political systems and economic models. Yet, the difference I notice is that China has been light years ahead with regards to not only generating money/growth, but also investing in growth.

In Vietnam, we don’t have that kind of projects covered in the series above. We have been working on the first ordinary metro for almost a decade and the project is only about 60% done. In the meantime, China has super fast trains operated in the country and a magnificent highway network. We don’t have the advances in technology that China has boasted about for years. On the global stage, we don’t command the respect that China does. If some of universities in China are now among the world’s best, those in Vietnam still lag so far behind.

Sad to say, but I have to admit that Vietnam blew a chance some 40-50 years ago. We used to be the Singapore of the region. Now, we are so far behind our peers and neighbors, and there aren’t many reasons that can convince me that things will be turned around in the future.