Weekly reading – 26th June 2021

What I wrote last week

A great podcast episode on Formula One as a business

Business

The World Relies on One Chip Maker in Taiwan, Leaving Everyone Vulnerable. The whole tech industry relies so much on TSMC and the story is likely to continue in the near future. It’s expensive and time-consuming for other countries to build anything that can compete with TSMC. On the other hand, this puts TSMC in an awkward position where it has to deftly navigate the complex political conflicts between superpowers.

Shop Pay available to all businesses on Facebook and Google. I think Shopify is trying to do two things here with this move: 1/ it’s trying to use Shop Pay as an acquisition tool. By making the checkout option available to even non-Shopify merchants on Facebook and Google, it is hoping that the tool can lure these merchants into selling on their platform. 2/ Obviously, this is going to also help Shopify increase revenue. Even though Shopify’s GMV has grown seriously in the last few years, GMV of non-Shopify merchants should be a lot bigger. Taking a slice of every non-Shopify transaction can be a lucrative business

Amazon labels millions of unsold products for destruction, new investigation finds. Lately there have been way too many articles that shed light on distasteful aspects of Amazon, from unbearable waste to unacceptable treatment of its worker. I have to admit that even though I am a fan of the business as I learned a lot from its story and I am a shareholder, I am strongly considering selling it as it’s just not comfortable any more.

A timeline of Google’s attempts at building a messaging app. The fact that you may be more familiar with Zoom, Teams or Slack should tell you a lot about how successful these attempts have been. Nonetheless, it doesn’t mean that they won’t succeed, ever.

Facebook officially launched audio rooms and podcasts in the U.S. Facebook is an extremely fast follower that is quite often deadly and effective at scaling what others made known. How they are going to make these new features will be interesting. I mean I am not an active Facebook user and neither are most of the people in my circle. Who will use these features to create content? Will celebrities and people that have a following choose to host their content on Facebook? Especially given that they should already have a home on either Twitter or Clubhouse? One big advantage that Facebook has over Twitter and especially Clubhouse is that it is much more famous and the network effect is easier to scale.

This one email explains Apple. The article does a good job of fleshing out a very interesting email exchange that could well be the foundation of the App Store

What I found interesting

Incredible 15th-Century Japanese Technique for Growing Ultra-Straight Cedar Trees. I love Japan and its culture. This is just one of the many many reasons.

Adobe launched tools to create 3D

Marc Andreessen just had a very interesting interview recently. In response to the question of what advice he would give to a 23-year-old, here is what he had to say

Don’t follow your passion. Seriously. Don’t follow your passion. Your passion is likely more dumb and useless than anything else. Your passion should be your hobby, not your work. Do it in your spare time.

Instead, at work, seek to contribute. Find the hottest, most vibrant part of the economy you can and figure out how you can contribute best and most. Make yourself of value to the people around you, to your customers and coworkers, and try to increase that value every day.

It can sometimes feel that all the exciting things have already happened, that the frontier is closed, that we’re at the end of technological history and there’s nothing left to do but maintain what already exists. This is just a failure of imagination. In fact, the opposite is true. We’re surrounding by rotting incumbents that will all need to be replaced by new technologies. Let’s get on it.

Source: Interview with Marc Andreessen by Noah Opinion

Stats that may interest you

The average age of vehicles in the U.S was 12.1 years in 2020

Shops, Facebook’s equivalent to Shopify, has 300 million monthly visitors and over 1.2 million monthly active Shops

DuckDuckGo has been downloaded 50 million times over the last 12 months and it has been profitable since 2014

Weekly reading – 19th June 2021

What I wrote last week

A study that revealed people preferred an electric shock to being left alone with their own thoughts

Some interesting comments from Walt Disney CEO on the business

Business

How Ondo’s Customers Using Shop Pay Installments Are Spending 2x More Than Regular Customers. The concept of BNPL isn’t new. What is interesting is that it is now adopted for stuff like socks.

Apple admits why its own Files app was ranked first when users searched for competitor Dropbox. Not a good look for Apple. It does seem that the top brass at the company didn’t know about this issue at all and once the issue was revealed, it was opposed. However, the thing about being the top brass is that you have to take responsible for what your direct reports do.

An interesting presentation on Mistakes of Omission. If you are into investing, this presentation can be very thought-provoking. One of the things that I keep thinking about is whether I am paying too much for a business and whether I unnecessarily increase my average price. I haven’t invested for a long time, but so far, most of my biggest winners happen when I decided to increase my average

A look inside Google’s first store. I hope that Google will use these stores as a showroom to demonstrate to the end users the awesome features it releases every year. Yes, the company isn’t known for making great hardware like Apple is, but the stores’ functionality doesn’t need to be restricted to hardware only. They can be a place to bolster customer relationships and educate end users on a variety of Google services. How many Google features do you not know? How many do you actually know about but haven’t used because they all seem abstract and complex at first glance?

PayPal lowers their rates for U.S merchants on Visa/Mastercard transactions and raised rates for their own products. This is quite a bold move to compete with Stripe, Square and Authorize.net as well as to clearly showcase their position. PayPal is confident enough in the appeal of their own offerings that they think a rate hike is justified. Recently, PayPal has been very aggressive on multiple fronts: engaging merchants and acquiring new users. I got multiple offers from PayPal and Venmo recently from $5 to download the app, $10 to reactivate my Venmo account or $10 to refer a friend.

A couple of interesting posts by CNBC on Roku here and here. I am not working at Roku, so I don’t know what the culture is like. Even if I knew what it was like, it would still be difficult to make a generalization as a culture works for many but doesn’t for others. Still an interesting case study

What I found interesting

I saw millions compromise their Facebook accounts to fuel fake engagement

This is a story about a Japanese diplomat who courageously defied his own government to save hundreds of Jews decades ago. I had never heard of Chiune Sugihara. I am glad that I did this week

I am not a fan of the New York Times nor am I a subscriber. But this investigative piece on the train crash in Mexico City is excellent

Senate passed a bill that would make it easier for folks to unsubscribe online. What can I say? Long overdue. One of the things that rarely come out of the Senate. All those subscription services, especially newspapers outlets, should feel ashamed of themselves for making it overly difficult for consumers to unsubscribe. I hope they will make this kind of shenanigan illegal.

When you are keenly aware of your own struggles but blind to others’, it’s easy to assume you’re missing some skill or secret that others have.

When someone is viewed as more extraordinary than they are, you’re more likely to overvalue their opinion on things they have no special talent in.

Everyone’s dealing with problems they don’t advertise, at least until you get to know them well. Keep that in mind and you become more forgiving – to yourself and others.

Source: Harder Than It Looks, Not As Fun as It Seems

Stats that may interest you

The price of lumber in the US shot up by 377% last year

40% of elementary students in Vietnam are obese, according to the latest survey by the Ministry of Health

Weekly reading – 29th May 2021

What I wrote last week

My review of Amazon Unbound

Business

A long post that outlines a bull thesis on Peloton

An excellent review of the new Apple store in Rome. Apple’s retail stores are great valuable assets. They build up the brand image of the company and function as hubs where customers can try out products, receive services and just really connect with the brand.

Instacart kicks off Priority Delivery. This new move by Instacart to deliver items in 30 minutes shows how cut-throat this market is. Competitors such as Instacart, Uber Eats or DoorDash strive to cut the delivery time to gain customers and market share. What remains to be seen is how it would affect Instacart’s bottom line. I don’t think that they are profitable yet. So, we’ll see when they release their S-1.

DoorDash and Uber Eats Are Hot. They’re Still Not Making Money. A pretty telling piece on delivery services

Amazon Briefing: A look inside Amazon’s cloud gaming ambitions

What I found interesting

Financial and emotional risks of working for a startup. Somebody took the time to write about the potential downsides of working at a startup. There are a lot of things to love about startup life and I am pleased to see people talk about it. But it’s also important to shed light on the risks as well

Google now lets you password-protect the page that shows all your searches. Privacy and security are powerful user preferences that are NOT going away any time soon. In fact, they will only get stronger. Google should do more and talk more about what they do in this area. I haven’t seen a lot of marketing efforts in talking about their initiatives to protect user data and privacy

How a Japanese Company Cut 80% of the Time Needed to Manually Count Pearls

Payment links from Stripe. This is what innovation should be

No, Millennials Aren’t Poorer Than Previous Generations. What stood out for me is that Millennials have more non-mortgage debts.

Stats that may interest you

As of 5/24/2021, 40%, 43% and 62% of Airbnb bookings for the summer of 2021 in Seattle, LA and NYC respectively were more than 28 days

75% of Target’s digital orders were fulfilled by their stores. 30 million Americans shop at Target every week

2.5% – 3.5% is what Costco reported as inflation in the latest quarter

iMac 2021’s thickness is 11.5mm, 1 mm slimmer than iPhone 2

Overwork Killed More Than 745,000 People In A Year, WHO Study Finds

Weekly reading – 1st May 2021

What I wrote last week

Olo, a SaaS company specializing in services for restaurants

The year the Earth changed

Business

Match’s Winning Formula for Online Dating in Japan Gives Women Control, Makes Men Pay. It’s amazing that an app available only in Taiwan, Korea and Japan is the 3rd highest ranked dating app. The ability to infuse a local culture and etiquette into an online dating app is a strength not to be discounted. Also, tucked in this article is IAC’s expertise in identifying hidden gems and turning them into diamonds

Florida is the latest state to create e-commerce tax. This development will be a boon to tax applications. The complexity of handling state taxes will spur SMBs or corporations to adopt these applications

Amazon lets advertisers send targeted messages for first time

Hey Google, Who Has the Best Capital Allocation in the Internet Sector? Google/Alphabet definitely has a shot at being the best capital allocator with their acquisition of YouTube, DoubleClick and Admob. There are various smaller acquisitions that we probably don’t know about

iOS 14.5: A Guide to Apple’s New App-Tracking Controls. I already opted out of all the apps

Music Streaming Royalties 101

What I find interesting

Newark cops, with reform, didn’t fire a single shot in 2020. It’s baffling to me that we put a lot of regulations in place for doctors, nurses or bankers, but we somehow find it impossible to keep the police in check and accountable. What happens in Newark is proof that we can reduce police brutality AND crimes. It’s socially and economically great for our society. It happens in a big city in New York. So what’s the excuse again for not trying?

Why the U.S. Still Can’t Donate COVID-19 Vaccines to Countries in Need. I understand that these drugmakers want to protect themselves from liabilities. But seeing Indians die by the thousands while the US has a lot of unused AstraZeneca doses just doesn’t make any sense. Contract or not, I am confident all parties can come to agreeable conclusions on how to save a nation. In fact, nations for that matter.

Exclusive Photos Inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. If you haven’t watched the mini series Chernobyl on HBO, I really recommend it.

A working study by University of Chicago suggested that length domestic travel bans might lead to higher Covid infections

Stats that may interest you

Apple has 27 registered developers and rejects around 40% of the submitted apps

In FY 2019, developers earned almost $11 billion in total revenue from the App Store

Weekly reading – 24th April 2021

What I wrote last week

On Apple’s new product: AirTag

Apple TV+, Netflix and the battle between Walmart and Amazon

Business

Google used ‘double-Irish’ to shift $75.4bn in profits out of Ireland. It’s good to know that 2020 was the last year that the “double Irish” loophole could still be exploited. I am curious to see the impact that the phase-out has on US corporations.

WSJ’s short profile of Korea’s “King of Ramen”

AirTag location trackers are smart, capable and very Apple

The Future of Apple Podcasts

Etsy SEO: How to Optimize Your Shop & Listings for Search

How Netflix and social media helped F1 buck a global sports sponsorship slump. F1 is an extraordinary sport and deserves to be the pinnacle of motorsports around the world. If you look below this entry, you’ll see a graphic showing how F1 cars can go into corners at a speed that we travel on a highway. On the straights, F1 cars can hit 360kmh. The technology that goes into building these cars and the skills that go into driving them are the best in the world. Yet, I still feel that F1 isn’t as popular as it should be. “Drive to Survive” and the resilience shown during 2020 really helped the sport become better known

What I find interesting

Typography at U7 station in Berlin

You can pay at Whole Foods Market with your palm now. While it is incredibly cool and convenient, I don’t think I will jump at the chance to use it soon. Amazon isn’t really known for their privacy practices. I am not too willing to give away my biometrics to them yet.

F1 cars can slow down by 144kmh in 1 or 2 seconds and carry over 150kmh into corners. Just think about that for a second. These cars drive into cars at the speed that is often the top you can reach on the highway

Source: F1

Stats that may interest you

Morning Brew has 3 million subscribers. It’s amazing what you can do with great writing skills and consistency

iPhone 12 models accounted for 61% of US iPhone sales in fiscal Q2 2021

Weekly reading – 27th March 2021

What I wrote last week

Great reminders for clustered and busy minds

Business

Amazon Keeps Getting Sued for Paying Drivers Less Than Minimum Wage. It baffles me to see that minimum wages can be such a polarizing issue or that it doesn’t garner more public support. In my mind, the US retail market is too big for any company like Amazon to abandon. Hence, if all the states and the federal government enacted a minimum wage law, what would Amazon do? Leaving the US retail market? Moving their operations to California or Mexico while paying import taxes and incurring more transportation expenses?

An interesting read on the e-signature market. All the companies that sell software to companies should really beware Microsoft. If Microsoft decides to invest in its own e-signature product and embed it for free in Microsoft 365, it will be a huge threat to the likes of Docusign.

Case study: How Akamai weathered a surge in capacity growth

How Nike is using DTC and data to expand its empire. For a legendary brand that has always been technologically competent like Nike, the pandemic is perhaps a blessing in disguise as it spurred consumers towards shopping online and exploring what the company has to offer.

Even God Couldn’t Beat Dollar-Cost Averaging. An interesting look at Dollar Cost Averaging vs Buy The Dips.

What I found interesting

Google and the Age of Privacy Theater. It seems that the new privacy approach that Google announced a short while ago may just be for show and won’t improve user privacy much.

Facebook’s ‘Red Team X’ Hunts Bugs Beyond the Social Network’s Walls

Hospitals Hide Pricing Data From Search Results. I really really hope that the Biden administration will look into this issue and impose a hefty fine on hospitals that actually did this.

A Brief History of Semiconductors: How The US Cut Costs and Lost the Leading Edge

Perseverance and redemption can be a wonderful combination, you know? Pierre Gasly is a young French F1 driver. Admittedly, I wasn’t a fan of his, but he grew on me. He got promoted to a top team in his 2nd or 3rd season in F1, only to get demoted half way to the season to an inferior team. He was brutally criticized and doubted in the media. And his best friend died in a tragic incident shortly before his demotion news. Yet, Pierre persevered and has shone brightly after his demotion. He had his maiden F1 win last year in Italy. Sweet sweet redemption. Here is what he wrote on the Players’ Tribune.

Stats that you may find interesting

42% of surveyed Americans reported an average weight gain of almost 30 lbs, according to the American Psychological Association

45% Bridge Millennials would switch grocers for access to contactless in-store payment

DOE aims to cut solar costs to 2 cents per kWh

Renewable energy met 97% of Scotland’s demand in 2020

Weekly reading – 6th March 2021

What I wrote last week

My take-aways from Berkshire Hathaway’s latest shareholder letter

A quick look at Buy Now Pay Later

Business

Demand for semi conductors exceeded supply by 30%

A look into Google’s failure to build games

A higher saving rate in American households is expected to boos the economy in the future

Macy’s, Gap, Neiman Marcus Will Let You Buy Now, Pay Later. The piece has some good information on the “Buy Now Pay Later” trend

WSJ profile of Roblox

A very nice post on Reddit’s history and its potential that has never been realized

The New Era of Social Media Isn’t About Feeds

A very interesting piece on payments in Vietnam. From my observation, it’s true that a lot of Vietnamese skip credit cards and go straight ahead to e-wallet.

Google is going to stop selling ads based on individualized tracking. As users are more conscious of their privacy and the topic becomes more scrutinized, I do think it’s in Google’s best interest to start looking at a new way to deliver effective ads. The macro environment is changing. The conditions are less favorable to their way of doing business. Why sticking to the old way? Google has enough talent and resources to pivot and innovate. If I were a Google shareholder, I would be happy about the news

Rolling Stones interview with Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey

What I found interesting

Taking on the tech giants: the lawyer fighting the power of algorithmic systems

Africa’s biggest air polluter is now battling sewage flows into a major water source

SoundCloud announced changes to how they compensate artists. The move is said to help less popular creators, but how much exactly the help would be remains to be seen.

Using Apple Silicon (M1) as a cloud engineer, two months in

How to operate an airport in Antartica

Stats that you may find interesting

21% of Vietnam’s eCommerce spend was from Digital/Mobile Wallet

Instacart claims that they are serving 85% of US households

Kohl’s partnership with Amazon added 2 million customers in 2020

If the world adopted a plant-based diet we would reduce global agricultural land use from 4 to 1 billion hectares

Weekly reading – 12th December 2020

What I wrote last week

How much money could you save from drinking coffee at home?

Business

The economics of the $2B+ Christmas tree industry

Bloomberg’s profile on OnlyFans, a potential major social media on the horizon

Uber sold its autonomous vehicle arm to Aurora. This move isn’t a surprise given that Uber has been trying to offload cash-intensive and loss-making businesses in order to focus on the ones that do make money. Though there is a big write-down from $7.5 billion to $4 billion, investors may find this deal good news

CNBC has a good article on AT&T, HBO and their effort to compete with Netflix and other streamers

Inside Google’s deal with French Media

Many Google employees came out with their version of the story involved Timnit Gebru, contradicting what the company publicly said

WSJ’s profile on a few men that helped build Microsoft’s gaming business today

Online grocery slowed down in the last few months compared to the height in the summer. The basket size continued to be relatively big, compared to the same period last year and pre-Covid months.

https://www.brickmeetsclick.com/stuff/contentmgr/files/1/495948404a0913f7ced51b6524a17539/files/bmc_scorecard_nov_2020_sm.png
Source: Brickmeetsclick

Clover, which belongs to Fiserv and sells hardware & software payment solutions to small businesses, a competitor of Square, seems to have a higher GPV as well as a higher percentage of sellers with $125k in annual GPV. As Clover has more than 90% of its sellers above the $125,000 GPV threshold, the figure is far smaller for Square.

Source: Fiserv

Technology

John Gruber’s review of Apple’s latest product: AirPods Max

What I found interesting

A story on a small coffee business in Vietnam that prioritizes sustainability

Benefits of walking

The US Department of Health and Human Services published a presentation on how unhealthy Americans’ diet is. The information is informative and use, but the presentation is hilariously terrible.

The old Americans get, the more they spend time alone

Weekly readings – 24th October 2020

What I wrote last week

How Apple Card’s balance grew by 50% in 3 months and the implications

Amazon Shopper Panel

Business

EU is shooting for an ambitious “industrial cloud” plan to rival the US

DOJ filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google and the tech giant had a strong rebuke

Will you exchange privacy for some money every month? If yes, Amazon will pay you $10/month for 10 receipts of non-Amazon purchases through a service called Amazon Shopper Panel

Doordash is still the market leader in the meal delivery space with 49% market share in September 2020, according to SecondMeasure

A fascinating story on a guy who learned, worked and blogged his way to be an authority in the podcast space

DOJ’s lawsuit against Google, a very interesting read with a lot of great information

Boosted by better-than-expected consumer spending and write-offs, card companies are eyeing more customer acquisitions

How Apple is organized for success

Technology

Emerging Architectures for Modern Data Infrastructure

Adobe released a new feature to help creative folks get credit for their honest work and fight misinformation

a16z released an interesting blog post on the promise of Payroll API

What I found interesting

Japanese Butter Tableware. Ain’t they beautiful and interesting?

How Egypt is growing forests in middle of the desert

A damning account of the failed project between Foxconn, Trump and Wisconsin. The red flags have been there for a long time, yet I fear this isn’t the last time we hear something about it

Weekly readings – 11th October 2020

What I wrote last week

My thoughts on Section 230 and why I think Facebook & Twitter are failing us

Business

An interview with the principal medical officer of Amazon Halo, Amazon’s latest health tracker. Amazon has an established relationship with consumers, a well-known & loved brand, a war chest and expertise in machine learning. It’ll be interesting to see how Amazon Halo will compete in this space.

A family business controls 97% of the ice cream truck music market

Covid-19 has decimated independent restaurants much more than it has the biggest chains

Google, once a friend, becomes a formidable foe of travel companies.

A startup released its Serie A funding round memo publicly. Pretty interesting.

The challenges that Disney faces in designing a strategy for Hulu

Technology

A comprehensive review of iOS14 and iPadOS14

Google announced a new feature that would allow users to look for songs by just humming. Don’t you love technology? It’s very remarkable

What I found interesting

Gen Z folks feed themselves misinformation. A pretty interesting yet scary revelation.

Pu Luong, a pristine and untouched beauty in the North of Vietnam, a few hours from the capital

How Oslo Achieved Zero Pedestrian and Bicycle Fatalities

If you have a chance to visit Dalat in Vietnam, try this dish. It’s great, delicious yet dirt cheap. I miss it.

On average, Americans spend $21 on subscriptions every month