Weekly reading – 17th April 2021

What I wrote last week

Hydrogen fuel cells vs Batteries

Uber may deliver marijuana in the future. Update on Credit Karma and Square

Business

Business Insider has a story on Larry Page, especially when he was determined to fire all Project Managers. Even a genius like him made a mistake, it seems. Don’t be too hard on yourself.

Why Delaware is the sexiest place in America to incorporate a company

Vimeo CEO talks about how the company reinvented itself from a video platform, another Youtube competitor to a B2B SaaS company. To be honest, as a consumer, I didn’t know that Vimeo transformed itself into a B2B SaaS player.

TikTok says that it has 100 million monthly active users in the US and is planning to bring new eCommerce-focused ads products

How the pandemic helped Walmart battle Amazon Marketplace for sellers. It’s exciting to see these two behemoths go at it in the near future. While Walmart has the luxury of stores scattered across the country, Amazon is a bigger and more experienced marketplace player.

Why It’s Misleading to Say ‘Apple Music Pays Twice as Much Per Stream as Spotify’. The best article on this particular subject that I have seen this week.

Amazon Plans Furniture Assembly Service to Catch Wayfair. I look forward to reading more about this initiative. While it sounds great as first, the reality may offer some questions that Amazon has to answer. For instance, Amazon is known for pushing its drivers to complete deliveries as quickly as possible. Asking drivers to take time to assemble products goes against that mantra. Hence, how much would Amazon be willing to slow down deliveries? How much would the premium fee offset the cost of such slowed deliveries?

What I found interesting

French lawmakers approve a ban on short domestic flights. If there is a great network of trains; which I believe there is in France, this is a totally sensible decision.

Cloudflare Pages is now Generally Available

How to Create an Interactive AR Business Card Without Code

The vanishing billionaire: how Jack Ma fell foul of Xi Jinping. Jack Ma is one of the richest people on Earth and among the most influential business people. Yet, he has fallen from grace after what he said angered Xi Jinping. Another billionaire tried to lower his net worth to avoid trouble with the Chinese government. I am from that part of the world. I can tell you that no matter how rich a person or how big a Western corporation is, you don’t take your disagreement with the ruling party public. That’s one mistake you usually don’t come back from

Stats that you may find interesting

According to a new survey by National Restaurant Association, only 18% of delivery customers preferred to order from a 3rd-party app

Amazon Prime has 200 million members. 28% of purchases on Amazon were made in 3 minutes or less while 50% were made in 15 minutes or less.

Almost 20% of retailers’ sales in 2020 came from private labels

Today I learned – 29th December 2019

I was reading the annual reports of Walmart and a couple of things stood out that I didn’t know before

Walmart’s increasing focus on eCommerce, Technology and Supply Chain in the US

Walmart’s CAPEX in eCommerce, Technology & Supply Chain stood at $3.9, $4.1, $4.9 and $5.2 billion in 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019 respectively. To put it in perspective, compared to the overal CAPEX in the US, the investment in eCommerce, Technology and Supply Chain made up 46%, 57%, 60% and 68% approximately in 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019 respectively. The increase highlighted Walmart’s focus on those areas in order to be competitive in a highly competed industry.

Source: Walmart’s annual reports

Member’s Mark revenue

In April 2017, Walmart re-introduced Member’s Mark, which is its private label umbrella brand at Sam’s Club. In 2018 and 2019, Member’s Mark’s revenue exceeded $10 and $12 billion respectively. The private label made up approximately 18% and 23% of Sam’s Club without-fuel revenue in 2018 and 2019 respectively.

Book: Retail Disruptors: The Spectacular Rise and Impact of the Hard Discounters

For the past two months, I lost interest in picking up a book for some reason. Nonetheless, the streak ended today as I finished this book.

The book offers a detailed and insightful view on hard discounters which usually act as disruptors in a local retail market. The book defines hard discounters as follows:

Hard-discount retailers offer basic goods and daily necessities at the lowest possible prices, while maintaining high-quality standards. A hard-discounter store differs from discount supermarkets or hypermarkets like Asda, Kaufland, or Walmart. Hard-discount stores are typically about 8,000-15,000 square feet, less than one-tenth the size of a Walmart Supercenter, with probably lower staffing levels.

To reduce costs, hard discounters often display items on shipping pallets and in the boxes in which they arrive. The store is minimally decorated and offers a limited assortment of consumer packaged goods and perishables – typically less than 2,000 stock-keeping units (SKUs). In contrast, the average US supermarket carried 40,000 to 50,000 SKUs in 2017, while a Walmart Supercenter sells over 100,000 grocery and non-grocery items.

Here is what I learned from it

Beware of potential threats in the market. The book told stories of retailers around the world that paid the price for under-estimating hard discounters. They dismissed the arrival of hard discounters at first and when they realized the threat was real, it was already too late to stop the hard discounters.

Benefits of offering a limited assortment of SKUs. I am usually overwhelmed by a plethora of choices at restaurants or supermarkets. As the book says, to shoppers who are under time pressure or who intend to buy rather than browse, a better shopping experience is to be offered streamlined options or a limited range of choices. Plus, retailers who sell a limited assortment, especially private labels, can negotiate a better economic deal with suppliers due to economies of scale. A better deal will help the margin of hard discounters. Additionally, a limited assortment of goods means smaller stores – lower rent, saved costs on logistics and staff.

Go-to-market strategy. Hard discounters tend to enter a new country through a specific market first. Get the foot in, the logistics and operations in and then expand. Also, each go-to-market strategy varies from one country to another due to a host of factors such as household income per capita, economic growth, shopping preferences. Blindly adapting a blanket strategy to different markets may lead to failures.

The book offers a comprehensive view on different aspects of hard discounters and retail in general. It confirmed my belief that a competing strategy can be made up of so many factors that are intertwined together, including to not limited to:

  • The size of assortments
  • Whether a retailer carries more private labels or national labels
  • How man perishable items a retailer carries
  • Whether it has a good brand name
  • Whether it has economies of scale
  • Whether the shopping preferences of local shoppers are a good fit
  • How much a retailer spends on marketing, promotions and discounts; and for how long it can sustain the effort.
  • A retailer’s culture

After penetrating a market, whether a retailer can survive the competition depends on the retailer’s ability to carve out a niche in the market where it can be competitive, using a combination of the above factors or more.

A few notable stats

  • Private labels account for somewhere between 70-90% of hard discounters’ assortment
  • In 2017, middle-class shoppers in the UK account for 60% of shoppers at Aldi and Lidl
  • In Germany, hard discounters accounted for three out of every ten euros spent on grocery purchases or 60 billion euros in 2017
  • Aldi entered Australia in 2001, and by 2017, had cost conventional retailers like Woolworths and Coles AU $16 billion in lost annual revenues
  • Trader Joe’s offers around 3,500 different items, Lidl between 1,500 and 2,000 while Aldi carries between 1,200 and 1,400 products
  • In Germany, Lidle was the largest advertiser among grocery retailers in 2017 (almost 280 million euros) and the sixth-largest advertiser in the country ahead of McDonald’s, Daimler, Unilever and Samsung
  • Trader Joe’s sales per square foot is $1,633, twice that of Aldi and Lidl, four times that of a Walmart supercenter and 8 times that of Dollar General
  • In Australia, 26% of Aldi shoppers were from high-income families in 2006. The figure shot up to 50% in 2014
  • For the average US grocery retailer, a loss of 1% in sales leads to a loss of 17% in operating profit