Weekly reading – 1st May 2021

What I wrote last week

Olo, a SaaS company specializing in services for restaurants

The year the Earth changed

Business

Match’s Winning Formula for Online Dating in Japan Gives Women Control, Makes Men Pay. It’s amazing that an app available only in Taiwan, Korea and Japan is the 3rd highest ranked dating app. The ability to infuse a local culture and etiquette into an online dating app is a strength not to be discounted. Also, tucked in this article is IAC’s expertise in identifying hidden gems and turning them into diamonds

Florida is the latest state to create e-commerce tax. This development will be a boon to tax applications. The complexity of handling state taxes will spur SMBs or corporations to adopt these applications

Amazon lets advertisers send targeted messages for first time

Hey Google, Who Has the Best Capital Allocation in the Internet Sector? Google/Alphabet definitely has a shot at being the best capital allocator with their acquisition of YouTube, DoubleClick and Admob. There are various smaller acquisitions that we probably don’t know about

iOS 14.5: A Guide to Apple’s New App-Tracking Controls. I already opted out of all the apps

Music Streaming Royalties 101

What I find interesting

Newark cops, with reform, didn’t fire a single shot in 2020. It’s baffling to me that we put a lot of regulations in place for doctors, nurses or bankers, but we somehow find it impossible to keep the police in check and accountable. What happens in Newark is proof that we can reduce police brutality AND crimes. It’s socially and economically great for our society. It happens in a big city in New York. So what’s the excuse again for not trying?

Why the U.S. Still Can’t Donate COVID-19 Vaccines to Countries in Need. I understand that these drugmakers want to protect themselves from liabilities. But seeing Indians die by the thousands while the US has a lot of unused AstraZeneca doses just doesn’t make any sense. Contract or not, I am confident all parties can come to agreeable conclusions on how to save a nation. In fact, nations for that matter.

Exclusive Photos Inside the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. If you haven’t watched the mini series Chernobyl on HBO, I really recommend it.

A working study by University of Chicago suggested that length domestic travel bans might lead to higher Covid infections

Stats that may interest you

Apple has 27 registered developers and rejects around 40% of the submitted apps

In FY 2019, developers earned almost $11 billion in total revenue from the App Store

The year the Earth changed

If you haven’t watched the documentary “The year the Earth changed” on Apple TV+, do yourself a favor: Subscribe and watch it! I guarantee it’s worth $5 you’ll pay, which still is less expensive than a lot of drinks at Starbucks.

The pandemic forced many of us to go into lockdowns, especially around March and April last year. The unusual pause in human activities led to a once-in-a-lifetime drop in human disturbance in the natural world. That is what this documentary is all about. The crew went to different parts of the world to record what happened to the Earth when humans paused for a change. They pieced together a beautiful story of how much the natural ecosystems benefited from our short-term retreat; which, by extension, is a condemnation of how detrimental our existence is to other species.

One example that I remember very well is how tourists to Africa endanger the lives of cheetah cubs. Cheetahs are the fastest sprinters in the world. They run fast because of their slender build. But it is exactly that build and the tendency to live individually that put them at disadvantage against other hunters such as lions or hyenas. Mother cheetahs are responsible for keeping their cubs safe and feeding them at least once every two or three days. The hunts are not always easy. Mother cheetahs may have to run very far away from their cubs to be able to catch and kill preys. Once a kill is completed, there begins a dilemma. Dragging a prey back to the cubs is a laborious task that may invite unwanted guests in hyenas and lions, against which the lonesome cheetahs stand little chance. Going back to fetch the cubs can protect the weak younglings, but mothers and children may find themselves with empty stomachs because the food will likely be stolen. Hence, mother cheetahs naturally use discreet and distinct voice to call the cubs over. They cannot make too big or too frequently a sound because danger always lurks around and the position of their powerless cubs may be compromised. Naturally, cheetahs adapt to the surrounding conditions to develop their ability to communicate with each other safely. Until humans. As tourists with all the noisy jeeps and talk make it exceedingly challenging for the cubs to listen to the call of their mothers. In the documentary, experts said that the pause in tourists to where cheetahs live increased the livelihood of cheetah cubs.

Listening to the engaging narration of David Attenborough and watching how other species’ lives amazingly became so much better without us is simply jaw-dropping. I couldn’t believe how much a disturbance we humans are. This pandemic is a blessing in disguise. No more theories. No more what-ifs. What happened in nature when we took a break was real. There is now recorded evidence that there is so much that we can and must do to protect our environment and other species.

An excellent documentary. Really thankful to those that put it together.