Weekly readings – 19th September 2020

What I wrote

I reviewed a few books such as: The Anatomy of The Swipe, Tape Sucks, The Motley Fool Investment Guide, 7 Powers: The Foundation of Business Strategy

I put down some thoughts on Apple Fitness+ and Apple One

Business

A deep dive analysis into Snowflake

A study on the effect of Wikipedia on businesses

Our estimates show that adding about 2,000 characters (approximately two paragraphs) of text and one photo to a city’s Wikipedia page increased the number of nights spent in this city by about 9% during the tourist season compared to cities in the control group.6 The effect comes mostly from pages that were initially relatively incomplete. In particular, the treatment increases hotel stays by about 33% in cities which initially had very short pages in a particular language, while there was no effect on city-language combinations where the pages were well developed.

Technology

A review of Microsoft Duo by WSJ. It’s quite concerning that a $1,400 phone has a subpar camera and a buggy software

What I found interesting

A brief profile by BBC of Freiburg, a green and futuristic city in Germany

An interactive map of the Earth some 240 million years ago

A damning memo of a Facebook employee on how the leadership turned a blind eye on election manipulations. She wrote “I have blood on my hands”

The US is almost at the bottom among advanced countries when it comes to well-being of children

The Three Year Rule: How To Stay Motivated Working On A Long-Term Project

A WSJ profile on Trevor Noah and his journey from South Africa to America

According to Census, Asians had the highest median income in the US in 2019 and foreign born folks grew median income at a faster rate than native-borns

Born a crime

If you haven’t read “Born a crime“, I urge you to. It’s a great book by Trevor Noah. He chronicled his story growing up in South Africa in an insightful and humorous manner. It cracked me up a couple of times. As the books I read are quite serious, the humor, positivity and his experience in the book give me a quick escape sometimes, especially on bad days. Like today. Here are some quotes I particularly love:

“Being chosen is the greatest gift you can give to another human being.”

“I don’t regret anything I’ve ever done in life, any choice that I’ve made. But I’m consumed with regret for the things I didn’t do, the choices I didn’t make, the things I didn’t say. We spend so much time being afraid of failure, afraid of rejection. But regret is the thing we should fear most. Failure is an answer. Rejection is an answer. Regret is an eternal question you will never have the answer to. “What if…” “If only…” “I wonder what would have…” You will never, never know, and it will haunt you for the rest of your days.”

“When you shit, as you first sit down, you’re not fully in the experience yet. You are not yet a shitting person. You’re transitioning from a person about to shit to a person who is shitting. You don’t whip out your smartphone or a newspaper right away. It takes a minute to get the first shit out of the way and get in the zone and get comfortable. Once you reach that moment, that’s when it gets really nice. It’s a powerful experience, shitting. There’s something magical about it, profound even. I think God made humans shit in the way we do because it brings us back down to earth and gives us humility. I don’t care who you are, we all shit the same. Beyoncé shits. The pope shits. The Queen of England shits. When we shit we forget our airs and our graces, we forget how famous or how rich we are. All of that goes away.”

“Language brings with it an identity and a culture, or at least the perception of it. A shared language says ‘We’re the same.’ A language barrier says ‘We’re different.’ The architects of apartheid understood this. Part of the effort to divide black people was to make sure we were separated not just physically but by language as well…The great thing about language is that you can just as easily use it to do the opposite: convince people that they are the same. Racism teaches us that we are different because of the color of our skin. But because racism is stupid, it’s easily tricked.”