Weekly reading – 10th September 2022

What I wrote last week

Apple is gaining share in advertising; Disney is contemplating an Amazon Prime like subscription

Business

The optimal amount of fraud is non-zero. A great post on fraud as an unavoidable risk of doing business

How Capital One Became A Leading Digital Bank. Some folks say that Capital One’s rise as one of the premier credit card issuers results from its robust data analytics. That may be true, but it’s still just a surface-level observation. What really drives Capital One’s growth is their investment in infrastructure & talent, as well as smart design of process to utilize such resources. In this article, you’ll see their CIO discuss this topic at length. As someone who works in the credit card industry, I admire what they have done and can really see why they are successful.

($) Amazon Is Still Trying to Digest Whole Foods. Integrating any multi-billion acquisition is always a challenge, but the task is even more daunting when the acquirer has to divert focus and resources to its own grocery effort. To that end, it’s impossible for outsiders to judge whether this move has been a success so far since Amazon doesn’t break out Whole Foods’ individual performance. Asking Amazon’s executives for their evaluation is similar to asking a barber if you need a haircut. It’s always going to be biased opinions.

The Facebook button is disappearing from websites as consumers demand better privacy. In the past, Facebook log-in button was all over the Internet. It was convenient and people weren’t aware of how Facebook did surveillance tracking over them. Now, the public knows and they don’t trust Facebook. The lack of trust leads to low usage as well as causes websites to be concerned about being collateral damage. As a consequence, websites don’t want anything to do with the then popular blue button. This is a prime example of how Facebook’s bad reputation is biting them in the behind and unfortunately for them it will not be the last as long as their business model is advertising based on surveillance tracking. “According to his company’s data, out of a sample of 10,000 sign-ins, 42.7% of users signed in with Google, 26.5% used Apple, 20.1% signed in via email and just 10.7% used Facebook.”

What’s SAP?

The Long Tail: The Internet and the Business of Niche

Other stuff I find interesting

Less is more agile. I agree with a lot of points that this article brought up. The traditional Waterfall method of delivering software had downsides which were especially exposed when software became increasingly complex. Only when technology got sufficiently sophisticated did we come up with a new methodology that is more efficient and allows us to incorporate changes faster. That’s Agile. But at the end of the day, Agile is just a tool and how useful it is depends a lot on who is using it and for what purposes. It’s NOT helpful to blindly follow what the coaches that have no knowledge of your organization’s culture or business say. It’s NOT helpful either to keep preaching the benefits of Agile while ignoring its downsides and what it demands from practitioners. What works for some won’t work for others. Just be mindful of what you sign up to.

I Worked at Capital One for Five Years. This Is How We Justified Piling Debt on Poor Customers. Consumer loan issuers do address real consumer needs. Health emergencies, family tragedy, desire to investment, etc. Sudden need for capital infusion. However, these issuers make most money from interest income, meaning that they WANT you to pay interest and not to default. That’s clearly not in line with the best interest of borrowers. Capital One, in this case, is just an example.

Bones: Why Utah’s desert is a paleontologist’s playground. “Only a very tiny percentage of species that ever existed on Earth have been fossilized,” according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Of those that have, only a fraction have been discovered. That’s in part due to accessibility; many fossils are likely buried so deeply that they’re unreachable. But it’s also because paleontology, as a science, remains fairly new. This particular site, now known as T2, is the confirmed resting place of a tyrannosaur, which may be the first complete adult specimen of an incredibly rare species. And the fact that it lies under 10 feet of ancient sandstone conglomerate in the Utah desert is no coincidence. Utah has been known as a paleontological treasure chest since the late 19th century. In fact, the Utah History Encyclopedia says the state boasts a “prolific fossil record that spans the entire ‘Age of Dinosaurs.’”

European cities look to phase out cars in ‘transportation revolution’. “Across the continent, urban centers are restricting cars from entering certain parts of cities as well as imposing new fees. In Paris, which holds car-free Sundays, only newer, less-polluting diesel and gasoline-powered cars can travel into “low-emission zones” across the city; by 2030, only electric or hydrogen will be able to enter the French capital at all. In Norway, where 78% of new vehicles are electric, Oslo eliminated most on-street parking spots in the city’s core. The medieval Belgian city of Ghent limits vehicles in the city center by offering free shuttles from low-priced car parks on its periphery. Drivers heading into London during business hours must pay congestion fees of $17 a day and further entry fees of $15 simply to enter “ultra-low-emission zones”; in some parts of the city, cars will soon be forbidden altogether.”

History of Labor Day

Vietnam’s Mu Cang Chai in ripe rice season a feast for the eyes. Beautiful as it is, this part of Vietnam is quite dangerous to get to. Some folks already lost their life because of treacherous roads and conditions. One of my friends nearly lost hers a few months ago. Definitely not for conservative and risk-adverse folks like myself, but I would love for the world to see my country and what we have to offer.

Stats

“Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power” series drew more than 25 million viewers worldwide on its first day

China Accounts for 36% of Global Peanut Output

Apple TV+ allegedly surpasses 6% of the global market share

Source: Recurrentauto

Weekly reading – 28th November 2020

What I wrote last week

I wrote about why I think Apple Card would be a significant credit card as Apple Pay grows more popular

I wrote about Target, Salesforce’s acquisition talk with Slack and Uber vs Lyft

I reviewed President Barack Obama’s new memoir “A Promised Land

Business

The difference in the business model between Booking.com and Expedia

NYTimes and The Washington Post expanded their subscriber base substantially in the last two years

Black Friday’s online shopping exceeded $5 billion

Amazon is strengthening its advantages with delivery capabilities that can rival UBS’

TikTok used its biggest stars in its legal fight against the US government

Research shows that unique visitors to Microsoft Teams far outnumbered those to Slack in October 2020

Technology

There are 123 Fintech startups in Vietnam in 2020. Most of them operate in the Payments area

Users of the new Macs with M1 referred to the hardware as having “alien technology”, “wicked” or “sockery”

What I found interesting

Hanoi and Saigon/Ho Chi Minh City is the second busiest domestic flight route in the world

This piece tells a story about how Utah uses collaboration and human touch to create policies that help foster the state’s equality and economy. Two quotes stand out to me

Utahns seem strongly committed to charitable works, by gov­ernment, alongside government or outside government. What­ever tools used are infused with an ethic of self-reliance that helps prevent dependency . . . when there’s a conflict between that ethic and mercy, Utah institutions err on the side of mercy

Betty Tingey, after seeing the news coverage about the Utah Compact, wrote to the Deseret News, “I don’t know much about politics except the sick feeling I get inside when there is constant arguing. . . . I don’t know how to settle debates, but I know a peaceful heart when I have one. I felt it when I read the Utah Compact.”

Source: American Affairs Journal

This clip about an 86-year-old baking master in Greece gave me mixed feelings. On one hand, I admire his work ethics, but on the other, it can be a condemnation of a system that forces old people to work this late in their life