Weekly readings – 28th December 2019

The last Weekly readings episode of 2019. I have had fun doing this because this serves mainly as my notes. I hope you got something out of these notes

Nadella is killing it at Microsoft and won the Person of the Year crown from FT

Walmart’s strategy in the fight against Amazon.

The World’s Oldest Forest Has 385-Million-Year-Old Tree Roots. The sheer number is

Coolest things I learned in 2019

Rural America Turning to Grocers, High-Fee ATMs as Banks Leave. If I tell this to my dad, who idolizes America, he probably will say I am crazy!

Apple’s secretive work on a satellite project as a company priority

Why your brain needs exercise

This seems to be a massive issue in the future for Amazon, especially when its 3rd party business has become increasingly important

The Dubai – Saudi Arabia route is surprisingly lucrative for Emirates

What’s Amazon’s market share? 35% or 5%?

‘Amazon’s Choice’ Isn’t the Endorsement It Appears

India needs new infrastructure

I am surprised at how well Hello Fresh has been doing

Americans are retiring in Vietnam and other Southeast Asian countries

The stark difference in how airlines display their purchase policies

During a purchase process of a flight ticket, interested buyers like you and myself care a lot about the policies such as those on baggage, change, rewards redemption, cancellation or refund. The longer and more expensive a flight is, the more we want to know about the policies of such a flight. Let’s look at how some of the popular airlines display their policies

Cathay Pacific – Great

It’s easy to see the important policies on Cathay’s flights.

Emirates – Great

You can see the difference in policies across tiers. It gives the audience a chance to compare the options and select what works best for them.

Eva Airways – Good

Eva Airways opts for a text-based presentation of policies instead of bullet points and icons like Emirates and Cathay. Even though the information can be read easily enough, there is room for improvement

Delta – Acceptable

Delta spells out whether a flight can be changed or refunded, but the UI is not as user-friendly as other airlines that we have seen above

Singapore Airlines – Great

Similar to Emirates or Cathay, Singapore Airlines makes it easy for travellers to see what they are paying for

Korean Air – Good

Even though the comparison is easy to spot, the information leaves something to be desired.

American Airlines – Below average

The airline displays some basic information, but you’ll have to click on the baggage and optional fees on the bottom left corner to have more details. Even then, it’s not really easy to digest their complex policies

United Airlines – The absolute worst

Look at these chunks of text. The airline doesn’t seem to want their customers to know what they are paying for. The use of text instead of visuals is bad enough. They manage to make it worse by using capitalized fonts which are not user-friendly AT ALL.

Customers do buy services or products deemed good value for their money. Subtly and implicitly scamming customers doesn’t generate much trust or goodwill. In a cut-throat industry, trust and goodwill can be the difference between prosperity and struggles.