Weekly readings – 29th February 2020

Paris Mayor: It’s Time for a ’15-Minute City’

Checkup for $30, Teeth Cleaning $25: Walmart Gets Into Health Care

Matthew Walker’s “Why We Sleep” Is Riddled with Scientific and Factual Errors. I like Matthew Walker’s book since I learned a lot about sleep from the book. I don’t know which side is correct, but it’s more important to give both sides.

The making of the Mandalorian

FOLDING GLASS: HOW, WHY, AND THE TRUTH OF SAMSUNG’S Z FLIP

Walmart is quietly working on an Amazon Prime competitor called Walmart+

2PM’s analysis of Wayfair

How a Hot $100 Million Home Design Startup Collapsed Overnight

Weekly readings – 15th February 2020

An interesting piece on Lyft vs Uber

An argument for the challenges that Google is facing

This is what a hearing should be. Not the kind that has taken place lately

Spotify is evolving

Oklahoma State’s new identity. In my opinion, the new logo doesn’t look bad at all

This article sheds some light on the secretive S team at Amazon

The government’s revenue depends significantly on the tax receipts from citizens and corporations. So the revenue projection depends much on the assumptions of economic growth which seem too optimistic. It’s important to take into account the feasibility of these assumptions; which the media may not capture fully or an average citizen cares enough about

Weekly readings – 21st September 2019

How Photos of a Remote School Went Viral, and the Happy Ending That Followed. A beautiful story that makes me appreciate what I have more

The Sun Is Stranger Than Astrophysicists Imagined

A Brief Primer of Asia’s Mid-Autumn Mythology in 3 Folk Tales. Ever heard of Mid Autumn season in Asia? This article offers a great primer on one of the most popular events Asians, especially Southeast Asians, celebrate.

Remarkable story about small Vietnamese community and its transformation

USC Law Commencement Speech. An honest and insightful commencement speech by Charlie Munger

Creativity Is the New Productivity

China’s second largest e-commerce site J.D.com Experienced a 480% leap in iPhone Preorders over Last Year

NPR Shopping Cart Economics: How Prices Changed At A Walmart In 1 Year

Amazon Changed Search Algorithm in Ways That Boost Its Own Products. The change in algorithm goes against the ‘customer-centric’ philosophy that Amazon is known for

The Cost of a Mile

Raising Prices is Hard

What Really Brought Down the Boeing 737 Max? A super long and doozy read on 737 Max, but boy, is it good!

Vietnam Becomes a Victim of Its Own Success in Trade War. As a Vietnamese, I am no stranger to the terrible infrastructure in my country. That’s why I haven’t been bullish on our chance at benefiting from China’s tariff war with the US

Silent Skies: Billions of North American Birds Have Vanished

Netflix: how will the story end?

I’ll take Heartland B-Cycle over E-Scooters

E-scooters have been taking over for the past couple of years. Brands such as Lime or Bird have received millions of dollars in funding and expanded to countries all over the world. Names like Lyft also ventured into this area. In big cities and even smaller ones such as Omaha, folks, mostly younger ones, can be seen riding scooters pleasurably.

Personally, I; however, prefer riding the rentable bikes from Heartland B-cycle. They are bikes available for rent for $10/month or $80/year at stations throughout an area of Omaha. Riders can use the bikes for one hour before having to return them to a station to avoid additional charges. There are a few reasons that can explain my preference for the rentable bikes.

Cost

My last ride with Lime was 0.7 mile long and it cost me $2.45. With $10/month, I can have unlimited rides with B-Cycle

Health issues

There is virtually no health benefit that can be gained from e-scooter. You hop on the scooter, turn it on and go. With B-Cycle, at least it’s going to be a nice cardio workout.

Maintenance

Already in Omaha have I seen many e-scooters left carelessly everywhere downtown. Folks have no regard in where they should leave the devices after use. On the other hand, you have to return B-cycle to its stations, unless you want to pay a significant fee afterwards.

According to Quartz, an e-scooter’s lifespan is 28 days. The Information reported that two of Lime’s models can last a bit longer, up to 17 weeks. In addition to expensive marketing and promotions, e-scooter companies burn a lot of cash in maintenance their fleet. Each Bird scooter costs $550. Imagine having to replace hundreds of them every 3 months. Bird has raised $415 million to date with the latest round announced just 5 months ago, but it is said to have around $100 million left in the bank and to have reduced its fleet.

The unit economics for e-scooters doesn’t look very appealing and there is no clear path to profitability. I do think more good would be done from having all that money invested in public transportation or alternative such as B-Cycle.

Some may argue that e-scooters are more flexible and can get riders to more places. Nonetheless, within 2-3 miles, a well-planned network of B-Cycle can get us into walking distance to anywhere. For a reasonably long distance, it would be much more expensive to ride e-scooters. And for a long distance, it’d be best to use other alternatives such as buses, cars or services like Uber of Lyft.

For your imagination, take a look at what Germany has for bikers