Weekly readings – 4th July 2020

What I wrote

I wrote a bit how relying on one metric, such as revenue, can be very misleading

A feature that I wish were available in iBooks

A very excellent and inspiring speech of Steve Jobs

I reviewed this book on Essentialism and this book on Personal Finance

An excellent conversation between Patrick O’Shaughnessy and Brad Gerstner

Business

New Competition Poses Limited Risk to Tesla’s US Marketshare

More than two-thirds of McDonald’s business is earned through its drive-thru operations. And internal figures suggest that nearly ten percent of many franchisee’s 2018 sales were attributed to third-party deliveries from: Uber, Amazon, Delivery Hero, Zomato, Postmates, Deliveroo, Swiggy, DoorDash, and Grubhub.

Source: 2pm

Apple’s Relentless Strategy, Execution, and Point of View

The house servant who pioneered the franchising business model

Average Target store generated $300 in revenue per square foot. The top 25% stores averaged $430 per square foot

Google revealed that news publishers kept 95% of ads revenue when using Google Ads Manager

The fall of Quibi: how did a starry $1.75bn Netflix rival crash so fast?

The real cost of Amazon

Harvard Business Review on rewards

In order for a rewards program to be a profit center instead of a cost center, the payout must be inextricably linked to desired behaviors

Investing in the unknown and the unknowable

Technology

After iOS 14, there’s almost no reason to buy an Android phone anymore

The Fasinatng… Fascinating History of Autocorrect

A cool tool to work with numbers, build models and share them more easily

What I think is interesting

The Consultant: Why did a palm oil conglomerate pay $22m to an unnamed ‘expert’ in Papua?

The value of downtime and enoughness

The true cost of dollar stores

An unprecedented investigative report by Reuters on the misconduct of judges and how the system is unfairly lenient on those judges. Have a read and see if you are not enraged by what is currently going on

How the Chinese government allegedly hacked the then leader in wireless technology from Canada and led to the demise of that company.

A good piece on how money flowing to the local police is invested. Police serve and protect the people, but they are equipped with gears and tools for wars. Who are they going to wars against internally????

“A Lesson on Elementary, Worldly Wisdom” by Charlie Munger

Weekly readings – 20th June 2020

What I wrote

I wrote about the new partnership between Walmart and Shopify

Arguably the hottest topic in tech this week is the saga between Apple and Hey

I also talked a bit about Verisign, a company that makes most of the Internet work properly

If you are interested in Quick-Service-Restaurant franchise, I wrote about operating margin that can be expected by a franchisee

A couple of quick tutorials on SQL and rolling average in Power BI

Business

If You Want Hertz, Have Some Hertz

How Robinhood Convinced Millennials to Trade Their Way Through a Pandemic. Robinhood now has 10+ million users and has become a phenomenon lately

The Observer Effect’s interview with Marc Andreessen

Stemming from the interview above, I found Marc’s previous post on productivity hack

A great post on Structured Procrastination

Structured procrastination means shaping the structure of the tasks one has to do in a way that exploits this fact. The list of tasks one has in mind will be ordered by importance. Tasks that seem most urgent and important are on top. But there are also worthwhile tasks to perform lower down on the list. Doing these tasks becomes a way of not doing the things higher up on the list. With this sort of appropriate task structure, the procrastinator becomes a useful citizen. Indeed, the procrastinator can even acquire, as I have, a reputation for getting a lot done.

Source: Structured Procrastination

The Risk of Outsourced Thinking

Google and HTTP

The Case for ARM-Based Macs

Amazon asks court to block former AWS marketing VP from working on Google Cloud Next speeches

How Large Is the Apple App Store Ecosystem?

Other stuff

The Death of Engagement. A good read on America’s foreign policy with China over the last administrations

A collection of free books from Springer

In Japan and France, Riding Transit Looks Surprisingly Safe

Architects have designed a Martian city for the desert outside Dubai

Weekly readings – 6th June 2020

A study published by Harvard University 20 years ago on why the US doesn’t like state welfare

What if our cities were just lit by stars

Source: Wired

How Many People Did it Take to Build the Great Pyramid?

Amazon is the fourth‑largest US delivery service and growing fast

Physical distancing, face masks, and eye protection to prevent person-to-person transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Community and the Crime Decline: The Causal Effect of Local Nonprofits on Violent Crime

Our analysis finds that each additional use of force policy was associated with a 15% reduction in killings for the average police department. Since the average police department had already implemented three of these policies, implementing all eight use of force restrictions would be associated with a 54% reduction in killings for the average police department. Even after taking into account the number of arrests made, assaults on officers, and community demographics, police departments with all eight of these use of force policies implemented would kill 72% fewer people than departments that have none of these policies in place

Source: Campaign Zero

As for policy, our results suggest that implementing the EO to recall military equipment should result in less violent behavior and subsequently, fewer killings by LEAs. Taken together with work that shows militarization actually leads to more violence against police (Carriere, 2016Wickes, 2015), the present study suggests demilitarization may secure overall community safety. 

Source: Sage Journals

An interesting profile on the richest man in India and Asia

Don’t Bring a Knife to a Gunfight with China

Fitful nightly sleep linked to chronic inflammation, hardened arteries

Four million parts, 30 countries: How an Airbus A380 comes together

Huawei Founder Ren Zhengfei Takes Off the Gloves in Fight Against U.S.

Weekly readings – 30th May 2020

Source: Economist

How Mongolia is one of the most successful countries against Covid-19. Zero deaths result from smart, decisive and swift actions from the government

A Window Onto an American Nightmare

600+ best startup pitches, including that of Facebook, AirBnb, WeWork, Uber, just to name a few

Facebook Executives Shut Down Efforts to Make the Site Less Divisive. More Congressional investigations and hearings?

Bundesliga partners with AWS to provide real-time data analytics. How can you not be impressed by that?

Why super apps are proliferating across emerging markets

Human cost of food delivery services

Trump’s New Intelligence Chief Spells Trouble

Slack CEO’s conversation on competing with Microsoft, notifications and the future of work

Splendid isolation: a surreal sakura season

On Rafael’s never-fulfilled potential as an architect

Behind the Fall of China’s Luckin Coffee: a Network of Fake Buyers and a Fictitious Employee

What Is the Business Model for DuckDuckGo?

Canadians bike more as they leave cars at home

Weekly readings – 16th May 2020

A scathing critique of AWS from this engineer

Related to the link above, this is quite a blog post from someone who used to work at Amazon and was working at Google at the time of the writing

Content, Cars, and Comparisons in the “Streaming Wars”. Matthew Ball’s essays are always great to read

The secrets behind the runaway success of Apple’s AirPods

How Morning Brew grew to $13m in revenue with 33 employees

Vauban Architecture: The Foundation of Central and Northern Vietnam’s Citadels

The latest memo from Howard Marks

How the most prized degree in India became the most worthless

WeChat Surveillance Explained

If Landlords Get Wiped Out, Wall Street Wins, Not Renters

All applications used at GitLab

Chicago Will Now Require Food Delivery Apps to Disclose Itemized Cost Breakdown. You can protect restaurants or you can protect delivery apps. In this case, I don’t think you can do both. I am glad Chicago went with restaurants

Source: Crunchbase

How Khan Academy Successfully Handled 2.5x Traffic in a Week

The faded beauty of abandoned cars across Europe and the US

“Visa saw an 18% rise in U.S. digital commerce spending during the month of April, excluding the travel category, as face-to-face transactions fell 45%”

From Boston to Saigon: A Coronavirus Quarantine Diary

Lessons From Slovakia—Where Leaders Wear Masks

Senate Votes to Allow FBI to Look at Your Web Browsing History Without a Warrant. I’d argue that this is a bridge too far into user privacy

Next time if you want to support local restaurants by ordering on delivery services like Grubhub or DoorDash, you may want to do a bit of research on how those services treat restaurant partners. Here is an example

Weekly readings – 9th May 2020

The decline in trust in governments shows no signs of abating. Everywhere you look, there is suspicion that measures taken by governments to combat Covid-19 will soon be used for mass surveillance afterwards. India is no exception. For A Billion Indians, The Government’s Voluntary Contact Tracing App Might Actually Be Mandatory

The pandemic doesn’t seem to affect spending on cloud infrastructure badly

The man feeding a remote Alaska town with a Costco card and a ship

Apple Watch detecting coronary ischaemia during chest pain episodes or an apple a day may keep myocardial infarction away

VP of Amazon resigned to protest the firing of workers who spoke out on the working conditions at Amazon warehouses

Looking Back on Four Years at The Times, in the words of their former CTO

Amazon pulled no punches in its public blog post on Microsoft regarding the JEDI dispute

Spotify should pay musicians more? Let’s talk more about how

Weekly readings – 2nd May 2020

While the world is struggling with the pandemic, some politicians took advantage of the situation to consolidate their power

America is wasting a lot of space on parking slots

68 Bits of Unsolicited Advice

Techcrunch’s profile of Flexport’s CEO

Seattle’s Leaders Let Scientists Take the Lead. New York’s Did Not

Taking a virtual tour inside a Pharaoh’s tomb

Weekly readings – 25th April 2020

IEEE has an article outlining the role of mainframes even before the crisis. I am always of opinion that mainframes aren’t going anywhere soon. The legacy system has its strengths that work in favor for data-processing companies such as financial institutions. I had a professor in Omaha before who was an executive at Mutual of Omaha. He told me in 2018 that one of the important applications at the insurance company is still on mainframe and they fly periodically a mainframe developer from Chicago for maintenance work.

In the last 70 years, the physical size of Kansas City has quadrupled while the population has remained relatively stable. (Put another way, every resident of Kansas City is on the hook for maintaining four times as much of the city as his or her predecessors.)

Source: We’ve Built Cities We Can’t Afford

Everyone is baking — and entrepreneurs are rising up to meet the demand

Uber’s Paid Sick Leave Policy Is a Perpetually Moving Goal Post

Magic Keyboard for iPad Pro: A New Breed of Laptop

Bloomberg’s story on AirBnb and the state of the known startup

Gruber’s review of iPhone SE

A report by WSJ on how Amazon allegedly uses merchants’ data to launch its own private labels. There is nothing wrong with Amazon launching private labels. The problem is that the company vehemently denied using merchants’ data to help it do so

A decision by Supreme Court that can prove to be defining in the future. I understand the logic behind deporting folks who committed crimes. What concerns me here is that the process didn’t take into account the recent behavior.

A damning report on Bird. I haven’t been a fan of the company or products. I get its value proposition, but coming from a country where scooters are the primary transportation method, I am as enthusiastic about Bird scooters as others. Plus, the high valuation in a short period of time, despite an unproven unit economics, always feels wrong to me.

Weekly readings – 18th April 2020

We need to talk about AirPods Pro

Companies Don’t Need to Lay People Off to Survive

Source: Nikkei Asian Review

A very good thread from one of USPS employees

A great primer on the existential challenge that USPS is facing

A great read on TAM from Credit Suisse

A good read on the FED and why it shouldn’t shoulder more blame for the economic crisis threat than the government

Social Distancing Is Bringing Drive-In Theaters Back to Life

How small business owners survived the Great Recession

The New Yorker’s profile of Mitch McConnell

A chilling report on how Bloomberg News bullied a reporter and his wife

The Postal Service Deserves a Permanent Bailout

Apple’s mobility report

Your Coronavirus Check Is Coming. Your Bank Can Grab It

A heart-breaking story on a brilliant young programmer who co-founded Cloudfare

It bid high and lost. Should Amazon be allowed a do-over on JEDI?

Weekly readings – 11th April 2020

Why Russia Fears Sweden’s Deadly Submarines

What Armenians should know about life in America

Meet the COVID-19 college graduates

Group M’s study on consumer trust in digital marketing

Source: Civic Science

Zoom’s user base exploded and so did its underlying issues

Apple and Google want to turn your phone into a Covid-tracking machine

Fossil teeth uncovered in Peru reveal that an extinct family of primates, thought to have lived only in Africa, made it across the ocean

Bernie Sanders quits: It looked so good for him. What went wrong?