Weekly reading – 23rd January 2021

What I wrote last week

A few simple tips to save money that I have from personal experience

I wrote about the debate on whether social media should censor Trump

Business

Internal deliberations at Twitter over whether they should ban Trump

Checkout.com vs Adyen

If you aren’t too familiar with Fintech, this article is a good place to start

A piece on a16z and its media-savvy founder

Apple TV+ is said to have only 3% of the market in which Netflix still remains the leader

21% of Chime’s revenue per user as of June 2020 came from ATM fees for out-of-network withdrawals

Nintendo – capitalizing on nostalgia

A survey shows that Apple may have a problem with Apple TV+ churn on its hands

A profile of the CEO of Edwards Lifesciences

The Story of a Cap Table: Affirm

Technology

The Myth of The Infrastructure Phase. Such an interesting read on the development of applications and infrastructure

The insider story of PDFs

What I found interesting

A beautiful beautiful letter on living a life worth living

Nikkei Asia has a nice piece on Covid-19 as an opportunity for Vietnam, given how the country has masterfully managed the crisis so far

Why cats love catnips

Axios has an 8-part (till now) series of great reporting on Trump and his post-election madness

Weekly reading – 16th Jan 2021

What I wrote last week

The Costco Model

Business

The latest memo from Howard Marks, just like his previous, doesn’t disappoint. He mentioned all the common senses in his memo which a lot of analysts and investors don’t seem to remember, myself included.

An informative interview by Patrick on an expert in the food industry

Neil struck it again with a sensible post on Apple’s share buyback

Visa’s new study on worldwide contactless payments after Covid

Bill Gates: America’s Top Farmland Owner

Second Measure looked at retention rate for different cohorts of Disney+ subscribers. I have quite a few questions here. How much of the bundle base came from the 3-year subscriptions sold at D23? Does the Prime Video include Prime Subscription which automatically includes Video?

Technology

You will soon be able to unlock your BMW with an iPhone in your pocket

Apple’s M1 chip can help you train models faster

DuckDuckGo is hovering around 100 million users/a day now

What I found interesting

What it’s like to go through a dramatic career change

If you are a left-wing protester, you’re 3x more likely to be forcefully confronted by the police in the US. My guess is that except from the aggressive looters, left-wing protesters are peaceful and give an impression to the police that they can use force against the protesters. Right-wing protesters appear more aggressive and intimidating. Plus, I wonder if the results are skewed because there are more states with the GOP-controlled local authorities than those with Dems-controlled authorities.

Dire Wolves Were Not Really Wolves

European Union gave citizens the “right to repair

This video clip is about how much Swedes trust their government and believe that their high taxes are in their benefits through free healthcare, education, great infrastructure and a great living standard. It can’t be more different from the US. Here, every time social benefits are mentioned, a lot of people can’t call them “socialists” or “communists” fast enough. It’s super fascinating to see people increasingly pay more taxes (as %) compared to billionaires and are convinced that a little bit of saving on taxes every month is worth having a low living standard and paying a lot of money for everything else. There is a natural and inherent distrust in the government that is the root of so many problems around here

Trump’s coup attempt of 2020-21, like other failed coup attempts, is a warning for those who care about the rule of law and a lesson for those who do not. His pre-fascism revealed a possibility for American politics. For a coup to work in 2024, the breakers will require something that Trump never quite had: an angry minority, organized for nationwide violence, ready to add intimidation to an election. Four years of amplifying a big lie just might get them this. To claim that the other side stole an election is to promise to steal one yourself. It is also to claim that the other side deserves to be punished.

When that violence comes, the breakers will have to react. If they embrace it, they become the fascist faction. The Republican Party will be divided, at least for a time. One can of course imagine a dismal reunification: A breaker candidate loses a narrow presidential election in November 2024 and cries fraud, the Republicans win both houses of Congress and rioters in the street, educated by four years of the big lie, demand what they see as justice. Would the gamers stand on principle if those were the circumstances of Jan. 6, 2025?

Source: The New York Times

Weekly reading – 9th January 2021

What I wrote last week

My review of the NYTimes as a business

If you haven’t heard of MDSave, read about my experience with it and how it can save you money

I talked about why I thought Apple’s Services have just only begun

Business

In the Face of Lockdown, China’s E-Commerce Giants Deliver

Consumer spending on the App Store reached $72 billion, compared to almost $39 billion generated on Google Play

A merchant detailed his dealing with Amazon. It’s mind-blowing to see how much Amazon charges merchants for being on their site and how much these merchants rely on the behemoth for revenue. While the total commission is high, that’s the price to pay when you don’t own the customer relationship.

Autodesk's sales growth after its SaaS transition
Source: Polen Capital

Technology

EV vehicles’ market share in France hit 19%, up 6x YoY

South Korea has 11 million 5G subscribers

Facebook published usage stats of their apps on New Year’s Eve. More than 1.4 billion voice and video calls were made on Whatsapp on New Year’s Eve

What I found interesting

The Eerie Beauty Of The Apple Watch Solar Face, And The Anatomy Of Nightfall

Hawaii beaches face the threat of erosion

Weekly reading – 2nd January 2021

What I wrote last week

I reviewed two books: Operaatio Elop and Turning The Flywheel

I wrote about an important lesson I will take with me into 2021

Business

How Domino’s Pizza Drove a 90x Increase in Stock Value

How to use Pinterest for Marketing

The fear of missing out seems to fuel venture capitalists and investors to value startups many many times over its revenue

How to build tech products for a diverse user base

WordPress has 40% market share

Restaurants complain about not making money with Instacart. If you outsource the relationship with your customers and accept the behind-the-scene role, you cede control as well as any profitability to Instacart.

Airlines are making it really hard for customers to use credits. All airlines try to make customers use credits, rather than get reimbursed with cash. But some, like United Airlines, are exceptionally terrible. It’s rich to claim you are about serving your customers when claiming flight credits because of Covid-19 is difficult.

Inside the deal between Google and Facebook that drew antitrust attention

The App Store and Google Play notched more than $400 million in spending on Christmas 2020, up 35% YoY

An interview with Strip Co-Founder. Stripe’s revenue in EMEA is reportedly almost $530 million in 2018.

Covid-19 has been good for streamers so far

A horrifying account of working at Apple by an international student

Oyo Chain Hotel is facing great challenges amidst Covid-19

Technology

How Apple’s rivals plan to catch up with the mighty M1 chip

EU Signs €145bn Declaration to Develop Next Gen Processors and 2nm Technology

What I found interesting

She Noticed $200 Million Missing, Then She Was Fired

What the Dunning-Kruger effect is and isn’t

Chinese Demography

China’s Empire of Concrete

Abortion, Once Unthinkable in Argentina, Becomes Legal

How ‘Feierabend’ helps Germans disconnect from the workday

A long read about the US’ response to Covid-19. I don’t know how anyone can read this report and say anything other than: there is blood on those who are supposed to be in charge, but fail their duty miserably.

A great read on why Trump supports connect with him. It’s not about policies or principles. It’s feelings. It’s about long held frustration.

Weekly reading – 19th December 2020

What I wrote last week

Adobe’s impressive performance and Disney’s true unveiling of Disney+

My thought on Apple vs Facebook and some data on iOS14 adoption

Business

Reviews of Apple Fitness+

Amazon is planning to offer a telehealth service to companies

A very interesting interview with the founder and CEO of Shopify on how to manage time.

A great letter from Brian Chesky on Ron Conway and his impact on AirBnb

Technology

This founder dodged a huge bullet after unintentionally racking up a Google Cloud Platform bill worth more than $70k+. Something to watch out for.

An interesting post that compares the new and old versions of Apple Map in Canada

What I found interesting

A new species of whales was discovered in Mexico. I kinda had mixed feelings after reading this. On one hand, I was glad we made this discovery. On the other, there may be some ignorant and greedy people trying to hunt them down for food or just an ego booster.

Reuters ran a piece on how the Coronavirus has evolved

A piece of good news. The Amazon seems to grow back

An inside story on how Pfizer achieved a miraculous feat in the race to produce a Covid-19 vaccine.

Weekly reading – 12th December 2020

What I wrote last week

How much money could you save from drinking coffee at home?

Business

The economics of the $2B+ Christmas tree industry

Bloomberg’s profile on OnlyFans, a potential major social media on the horizon

Uber sold its autonomous vehicle arm to Aurora. This move isn’t a surprise given that Uber has been trying to offload cash-intensive and loss-making businesses in order to focus on the ones that do make money. Though there is a big write-down from $7.5 billion to $4 billion, investors may find this deal good news

CNBC has a good article on AT&T, HBO and their effort to compete with Netflix and other streamers

Inside Google’s deal with French Media

Many Google employees came out with their version of the story involved Timnit Gebru, contradicting what the company publicly said

WSJ’s profile on a few men that helped build Microsoft’s gaming business today

Online grocery slowed down in the last few months compared to the height in the summer. The basket size continued to be relatively big, compared to the same period last year and pre-Covid months.

https://www.brickmeetsclick.com/stuff/contentmgr/files/1/495948404a0913f7ced51b6524a17539/files/bmc_scorecard_nov_2020_sm.png
Source: Brickmeetsclick

Clover, which belongs to Fiserv and sells hardware & software payment solutions to small businesses, a competitor of Square, seems to have a higher GPV as well as a higher percentage of sellers with $125k in annual GPV. As Clover has more than 90% of its sellers above the $125,000 GPV threshold, the figure is far smaller for Square.

Source: Fiserv

Technology

John Gruber’s review of Apple’s latest product: AirPods Max

What I found interesting

A story on a small coffee business in Vietnam that prioritizes sustainability

Benefits of walking

The US Department of Health and Human Services published a presentation on how unhealthy Americans’ diet is. The information is informative and use, but the presentation is hilariously terrible.

The old Americans get, the more they spend time alone

Weekly reading – 5th December 2020

What I wrote last week

The three changes I made to my lifestyle during Covid

Business

Shopify’s Black Friday sales in 2020 exceeded $2.4 billion, a 75% growth year over year

Reddit now has 52 million daily active users, up by 44% YoY

An excellent piece on the longevity of some amazing small businesses in Japan. A mochi shop that has been around for more than 1,000 years? You read that right. 1,000 years, not 10, not 100, not 500. 1000! And many of them maintain enough in reserve to continue operations for 2 years in case there is an economic downturn.

Some great statistics on Spotify’s podcast ecosystem

Apple officially launched their new App Store Small Business Program. An important detail to note is that the $1million threshold is after Apple takes its cut, not before. Hence, it will give many developers more breathing room.

How Apple approached its retail stores during Covid

Technology

A deep dive into why M1 is so fast

What I found interesting

A Russian female chess player beat known male players in the 1920s and 1930s, apparently the inspiration for the series “The Queen’s Gambit” on Netflix

A horrifying account of how hospitals are struggling to keep up with the rising number of Covid-19 patients. It’s unfathomably insane to read, like a fictional story, not what actually is transpiring.

100 powerful pictures of 2020 by Reuters

The Sistine Chapel of South America. It looks utterly amazing

Derek Thomson of the Atlantic wrote about Democrats’ problems and what is wrong with the Electoral College. Read the excerpt below. If you support the GOP, then it’s good news. But if the shoe is on the other foot, as in the case for Democratic voters, saying that it is unfair is a massive understatement

The GOP currently holds both Senate seats in Alaska, Arkansas, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming. Those 11 states have 22 senators who collectively represent fewer people than the population of California, which has two Senate seats.

In the 2018 midterms, Democratic Senate candidates won 18 million more votes than Republicans nationwide, and the party still lost two net Senate seats.

One analysis of Census Bureau data projected that by 2040, roughly half of the population will be represented by 16 senators; the other, more rural half will have 84 senators at their disposal.

Source: The Atlantic

Weekly reading – 28th November 2020

What I wrote last week

I wrote about why I think Apple Card would be a significant credit card as Apple Pay grows more popular

I wrote about Target, Salesforce’s acquisition talk with Slack and Uber vs Lyft

I reviewed President Barack Obama’s new memoir “A Promised Land

Business

The difference in the business model between Booking.com and Expedia

NYTimes and The Washington Post expanded their subscriber base substantially in the last two years

Black Friday’s online shopping exceeded $5 billion

Amazon is strengthening its advantages with delivery capabilities that can rival UBS’

TikTok used its biggest stars in its legal fight against the US government

Research shows that unique visitors to Microsoft Teams far outnumbered those to Slack in October 2020

Technology

There are 123 Fintech startups in Vietnam in 2020. Most of them operate in the Payments area

Users of the new Macs with M1 referred to the hardware as having “alien technology”, “wicked” or “sockery”

What I found interesting

Hanoi and Saigon/Ho Chi Minh City is the second busiest domestic flight route in the world

This piece tells a story about how Utah uses collaboration and human touch to create policies that help foster the state’s equality and economy. Two quotes stand out to me

Utahns seem strongly committed to charitable works, by gov­ernment, alongside government or outside government. What­ever tools used are infused with an ethic of self-reliance that helps prevent dependency . . . when there’s a conflict between that ethic and mercy, Utah institutions err on the side of mercy

Betty Tingey, after seeing the news coverage about the Utah Compact, wrote to the Deseret News, “I don’t know much about politics except the sick feeling I get inside when there is constant arguing. . . . I don’t know how to settle debates, but I know a peaceful heart when I have one. I felt it when I read the Utah Compact.”

Source: American Affairs Journal

This clip about an 86-year-old baking master in Greece gave me mixed feelings. On one hand, I admire his work ethics, but on the other, it can be a condemnation of a system that forces old people to work this late in their life

Weekly readings – 21st November 2020

What I wrote last week

AirBnb S-1

Raving reviews on Apple’s new chip M1

Business

Digital ad spending is estimated to exceed traditional ad spending in the US this year

Amazon is about to make serious noise in the pharmaceutical industry

Intel and AMD have to talk about gigahertz and power because they are component providers and can only charge more by offering higher specifications. “We are a product company, and we built a beautiful product that has the tight integration of software and silicon,” Srouji boasted. “It’s not about the gigahertz and megahertz, but about what the customers are getting out of it.” 

Source: Why M1 matters to Apple

Technology

The Verge’s review of Apple Macbook Pro with M1 chip

What I found interesting

Republicans tend to sound the honk on the federal deficit when it’s convenient for them. Here is how BBC debunks the deficit myth

Why Obama fears for our democracy

It’s pretty heart-breaking to see what has been happening in Central Vietnam for the last few months. A Western reporter at Saigoneer courageously went there, took photos and wrote about it beautifully.

Weekly readings – 14th November 2020

What I wrote

My reaction to Biden’s win

My thoughts on DoorDash’s S-1 filing

Business

Loup Ventures on Apple Pay

CBInsights has a long helpful piece on ByteDance, the owner of TikTok

Is advertising a new source of revenue and profit for big box retailers?

Apple’s transparency report which includes data on how often it complied with requests from authority

Technology

A couple of reviews of Homepod Mini by The Verge and WSJ

Apple executives talked to The Independent about the new chip M1 and how they were surprised at their breakthrough. Safe to say, there won’t be Macs with touchscreens any time soon.

Autonomous vehicles are hard. Really hard. Uber now wants to offload its autonomous vehicle arm to Aurora.

What I found interesting

The EU is about to relax regulations on encryption, a move that can threaten user privacy

Why Democrats lost Latinos in South Texas

Less screen time and more sleep critical for preventing depression