Weekly reading – 19th February 2022

I didn’t write anything last week and this weekly post is late because I was traveling back to Vietnam and locked out of my account. My blog’s two-step authentication requires a verification by SMS, but my carrier doesn’t enable calls or messages outside the US.

Business

Sequoia’s invisible hand: How Roelof Botha became one of the most powerful people in venture capital. VCs usually cut overly confident figures but this profile shows that even one of the best in the business expects himself to have unsuccessful deals and do have unsuccessful deals. Even one of the best needs support in times of uncertainty.

The Hidden Ways Companies Raise Prices. I have no beef with businesses that raise prices to cover high costs. I do have a beef with companies that do so sneakily. Be upfront and tell me that you have to raise prices due to inflation. Be straight and transparent with me.

DoorDash to Bump Up Its Fees on Slow McDonald’s Restaurants. An interesting look at the negotiation between a delivery service like DoorDash and a merchant like McDonald’s. DoorDash has considerable bargaining power, in my opinion, because it can drag an icon like McDonald’s to the negotiation table and get a deal.

Doing Business in Myanmar Is Tough, but Norway’s Telenor Finds That Leaving Isn’t Much Easier. While I feel bad for Telenor as the company has to find a way to leave Myanmar even though it only tries to do good by the people, I feel even worse for the people of Myanmar.

Discover Is Bringing a Payment Option Popular in Asia to the U.S. Discover is expected to announce a new partnership later this week that will enable merchants to accept payments through checking accounts. I am eager to learn how Discover is going to change consumer behavior and how this kind of initiative would affect the arguably duopoly of Visa and Mastercard

Inside Facebook’s $10 Billion Breakup With Advertisers. The article struck a positive and compassionate tone for Facebook as it didn’t mention once that the business model is built on users’ data and can violate their privacy or that Facebook usually leads the news headlines for all the wrong reasons related to that business model.

Other stuff I found interesting

How Pfizer made an effective anti-covid pill. “Right away, researchers got a lucky break. When Pfizer checked, it found that none of the thousands of proteins in the human body shared the same bit of molecular structure they planned to interfere with in SARS-CoV-2. That meant they could hit the virus hard and not expect any major side effects. Nature had provided the scientists with a big bull’s-eye”

The Logistics Behind Deicing Airplanes. I think after watching this clip by WSJ, I become more understanding any time flights are delayed.

Stats

According to a presentation to investors by Shopify, Amazon has 41% of the U.S eCommerce while Apple has 4%

The discontinuation of Monthly Child Tax Credits is allegedly pushing 3 million kids back into poverty

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.