Average car monthly payment

I came across this tweet from a Twitter user that is known for passion and knowledge about the micro-mobility area

A bit of tracking down his comment section led me to this article which is likely his source

Source: Nerdwallet

The figure doesn’t include other expenses such as gas, parking or insurance. A monthly insurance can go up to $100 easily and parking fees in my current building are $100 as well. Throw in gas expense and suddenly the cost of ownership can swell up to a significant amount. The estimate doesn’t take into account some ad-hoc expenses such as maintenance, decoration, paperwork…

If your income can easily cover the monthly expenses and a car is an absolute necessity every day; which is the case for many here in America, then owning a car is fine. The issue; however, is that there are many whose income isn’t stable or big enough to cover the expenses. They get themselves into debt and financial troubles for owning a car or upgrading one.

Buying a car is a big investment in my opinion and should be taken seriously.

I was a student for 2.5 years in a town where public transportation is horrible and have lived in the US for 3 years. I don’t drive and I can honestly say I survived quite well. If even I can do it, it’s possible.

Fairness for High Skilled Immigrants Act vs BELIEVE Act

A few days ago, the Fairness for High Skilled Immigrants Act was passed by the House. If it’s passed by the Senate and signed by the President, it will have dramatic implications for immigrants coming to and living in the US. That prospect; though, faces challenges from a few Senators from both sides of the aisle.

Apparently, no country in the world is allowed more than 7% of the total green cards handed out by the US government every year. For workers from China and India, due to high demand, there is a current backlog of applications that it can take up to 50 years to receive the green cards.

The Fairness for High Skilled Immigrants Act plans to eliminate the capped amount per country. Doing so will benefit high skilled workers from China and India the most, but at the expense of, well, almost everybody else from other countries. The backlog of current applications from India and China will take years to clear and after that it will mean 8-10 years for folks from low-demand countries like myself from Vietnam to get my turn.

The bill essentially seems to tackle only one problem in a myriad of problems with immigration. Hence, it is said to create other issues, per path2usa.

Senator Rand Paul introduced a different immigration bill called Backlog Elimination, Legal Immigration, and Employment Visa Enhancement Act or BELIEVE Act. The act is aimed to change immigration on a broader level and tackle more issues than the Fairness for High Skilled Immigration Act. Cato.org has a pretty good summary of what BELIEVE Act can deliver here. This is a snippet, in case you are too lazy to click and read the article

There are a couple of problems with skilled immigration that the bill doesn’t address—including the outdated H-1B limit and the burdensome and nonsensical labor certification process for employers—but overall, the legislation would make the United States far more competitive for foreign talent than current law and prevent the removal of hundreds of thousands of skilled workers. This legislation would benefit the U.S. economy enormously.

Cato.org on BELIEVE Act

Goal setting, self-comparison and happiness

Kylie Jenner, Mark Zuckerberg and Warren Buffett are American business icons and billionaires. The difference between them? Mark Zuckerberg and Kylie are former and current youngest self-made billionaires at 23 and 21 respectively while Warren Buffett’s reached 10 digits when he was in his 50s. 99% of his net worth came about after his 52nd birthday

Source: The 10X Entrepreneur

If your goal is to become a billionaire, would you consider yourself a failure or a success at the age of 45? Or if you become one at the age of 80, yet still have a hell lot of more money than thousands of people on Earth, will that still be a success?

Or just having enough to take care of yourself, your family and to have enough freedom to enjoy the life will be enough? If you make $100k a year while living in an inexpensive city like Omaha, will you be happy about it? Or will you feel jealous of those your age making $150k in California?

Setting goals is one of a proven methods to get things done and become a better version of yourself. Yet, the art of setting goals is, in my opinion, tricky. Too ambitious a goal will require more effort and time, sometimes leading to burnout, stress and the risk of missing out on a lot of what life has to offer. A goal that is set too low is unable to unlock full potentials and lead to under-achievement.

Often times, we tend to look to others as a yardstick to measure ourselves and our goals against. There is a fine thin line between purely comparing ourselves against others to know where we objectively are and jealousy which is detrimental to our mental and emotional health.

The intricate relationship between goal setting, comparison of yourself to others and happiness makes it more of an art than a science. I believe it’s not possible to have a formula or a mould that can be universally applied. Each person is different and hence so is how the person approaches this issue.

Random poem #2

Determined to get better at writing, I forced myself to sit down till I actually put together something. Here it is, a short poem.

Come here if you wanna know

How Midwest summer really is

Green leaves blossom on the trees

Happy faces are all that you see

——————————————-

By dawn, the night bids its goodbye

Making way for the gorgeous sunlight

15 hours long, it will be

For the sun truly takes its hike

——————————————-

Contrary to what you think

Work in the summer is not easier

Beautiful and enticing sun

Makes us nothing but much less efficient

——————————————-

Every day I look out from the office window

Longing badly to bathe in the sun

To walk, to hike and to bike

To really revel in the summer fun

Struggling to find the right balance

These days, I often find myself in the middle of these dilemmas:

Work on the weekends or enjoy the summer

Some recommend that to get ahead of others, you work on the weekends or when others are not. The logic makes sense. If you work properly, the more hours are put in, the better you should become. Yet, there is another side of me that wants to enjoy this beautiful summer. Midwest winter is hard. It’s unpredictable, it’s cold, it’s winter and it’s lengthy. Summer days are long in demand, but shorter in supply. I constantly struggle to choose which path I should follow in this regard

Set ambitious goals or stay relaxed and spontaneous

I used to be a goal-setting & future-oriented kind of a guy, yet I have worked to be more spontaneous and scale back my obsession with goal setting. It was good till I reflected upon what has been achieved for the first 6 months of the year and what lies ahead in the other 6. I found myself lacking. I found myself becoming a bit complacent. The urge to stay spontaneous and in the moment is still there, but perhaps I should mix it with some ambitious goals to give myself a push. The question is: what constitutes the right balance?

Sleep more or do more

Besides my day job, I commit myself to regular reading, working out, exploring the city, meeting new people and side projects such as this blog. Sometimes, travel sneaks into the to-do list like a thief as well. What I want to do keeps growing and growing while time doesn’t. As a fan of the Why We Sleep book, I understand the importance of sufficient sleep. I do want to sleep at least 8 hours a day, but I also want to do as much as possible when youth is still on my side. If I want an easy life later on, I need to work hard now. But as Matthew Walker, the author of Why We Sleep, said: once you lose sleep time, there is no way to get it back.

These questions and dilemmas need answering and solving quickly. The longer I have them unsolved and unanswered, the more time will be lost. Yet it’s not easy. Not easy to make a decision without full information. Or not easy to live with the consequences. Either way, I need to find a balance soon.

The paradox of the NBA

NBA free agency started on Sunday night. It has been a melee with numerous deals announced after the 6pm mark. Bleacher Report claimed that the first day of the free agency saw $3bn in contracts signed.

That’s a lot of money. Players’ lives are changed over night. Career takes dramatic turns over night.

Yet, the irony in all this show of wealth is that while some players command attention, freedom and money, others may not be able to choose where to work. Grown men in the 20s or 30s don’t even get to choose where to work and live. If traded suddenly, they have to uproot their family and disrupt their spouses or kids’ lives.

That’s what I find very sad about the NBA. At least in soccer or what we call football, players have all the freedom in the world to choose where to work. If they don’t want to, their current clubs can’t force them out, unless contracts are broken and the players get all the contract value. Take Gareth Bale for instance. His manager doesn’t want him. His club doesn’t want him. His teammates don’t like him. The fans in Madrid don’t want to see him. Yet, unless he is willing to be transferred, there is nothing that Madrid can do.

Another disappointing aspect of the NBA is some hostile fans. By playing, players essentially trade their time and health for money. Injuries happen. Your body takes a toll. Continuous workouts are required. Media presence is mandated. Yet, players sometimes don’t get to choose where to play and live. Nonetheless, that doesn’t stop hostile fans from throwing tantrums at players whenever they do what is in their best interest. Take Kevin Durant for instance. He did what he thought was best for him by signing with GSW. Yet, he is called soft, a snake and other vulgarities.

Money and fame do come at an expense. Costly expense.

Passport, Signal of Trust and Credibility

A new ranking by a Singapore-based consulting firm saw Vietnamese passport climb up a few positions compared to last year, even though it still belongs to the bottom tier. As of this year, Vietnamese citizens can travel to 61 countries where there is no visa requirement or visas can be issued upon arrival.

What does a passport signal actually?

It signals to the destination countries how trustworthy, credible and civil the passport holder is likely going to be. For instance, a US passport holder can travel to more than 100 countries without visa restrictions since being a US citizen signals that he or she comes with the credibility of the US as a nation. Meanwhile, since Vietnam is a poor country with less credibility, the citizens can only travel to 61 countries visa-free.

That’s on a macro level.

However, I have lived in 3 Western countries and traveled to more than 10 different nations without any blemish on my civil profile, not even a parking ticket. My personal track record should be sufficient for other countries to trust me. Instead, a Nebraskan who never boards a plane before can go to Canada tomorrow without a visa while I will have to apply for one and next-day trips are, hence, out of question.

The asymmetry of information and the lack of credibility of a nation that cascades down to its citizens create a lot of problems and inconvenience for some individuals.

I wish there would be a blockchain-based system in which past records are impossible to alter unless perpetrators like to waste a huge amount of computing power, information is secure and everybody can access. That way, credibility can be assessed on an individual level, not a national one.

By the way, if you are fortunate enough to be born with a powerful passport, do travel. Don’t take it for granted. Explore the world and have some compassion towards less fortunate others. Just like me, many wish to travel freely, but can’t.