Weekly reading – 13th March 2021

What I wrote last week

My thoughts on Square’s acquisition of Credit Karma’s tax unit

My review of the book Think Again: The Power Of Knowing What You Don’t Know

Business

An interview with Elliot Turner on Twitter. Lots of good stuff in here.

Octahedron Capital publishes a super interesting presentation every quarter, compiling quotes from executives

A very interesting piece on how Jeff Bezos approached design. I love the anecdote on how Amazon’s logo came into beings.

How Salesforce became Silicon Valley’s best late-stage tech investor. Salesforce is a prime example that you should care more about Operating Income than Net Income if you want to evaluate a company’s operations

A great post on the importance of reinvesting in a business. As the saying goes, it’s one thing to get to the top of the mountain, it’s another to stay there.

A great conversation between The Verge and Twitter’s Head of Consumer Product. The company announced some very interesting product developments in the pipeline. As a fan of the platform, I can’t wait to see what unfolds next

Postmates added $70 million in revenue and saved $3 million in network fees with Stripe

Neil Cybart published a new article on the importance of Apple’s retail stores

A very telling piece on how Facebook’s internal effort to curb misinformation using AI was punted by Zuckerberg’s desire for growth

What I found interesting

Apple Gave Us an Exclusive Look Inside Its Next-Generation Fitness+ Studio

Tesla told California DMV that its future autonomous vehicles wouldn’t be fully autonomous. What else is new?

WSJ’s profile on Manchester United star forward, Marcus Rashford. If you are not familiar with football (yeah, the real football where the ball touches feet more than hands), Manchester United is one of the richest and biggest clubs in the world. It has a reputation of playing home-grown talent and actually has been fielding at least one academy player every game for the last few decades. Marcus Rashford is the latest biggest home-grown star that came out of the famed academy. Inspired by his difficult childhood, Rashford took on the British government last year, in a campaign aimed at providing school meals to children during Covid-19. The government listened and hundreds of kids were fed because Marcus Rashford had the will to do what his reputation enabled him to.

Corporate logos are changing with the time

A look into the cyber-surveillance world of Israel

Stats that you may find interesting

Costco edged by Amazon and Apple to lead all brands in customer satisfaction

India leads the world in IPv6 adoption rate at 63%

Disney+ has more than 100 million subscribers. Though the count is impressive, comparing it with Netflix’s subscriber base, either now or when it first started, may require a lot of unpacking. The consumer attitude towards streaming is different now than it was when Netflix began to stream its content online. The mix of subscriber base is also different. Disney+ has 30% of its subscribers. Nothing inherent bad about it, but to have an apple-to-apple comparison, one must figure out whether Netflix has the same composition. Plus, the streaming competition 10 years ago for Netflix might be much less fierce than the current landscape.

If you need more evidence as to how different a GOP government and a Democratic government are, here it is. One proposed a law that benefits low-income folks (Democrats) while the other passed a law that put more money in the pocket of the richest.

Source: TPC

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