Weekly reading – 16th October 2021

What I wrote last week

Cardless – The startup behind the Boston Celtics, Manchester United and Cleveland Cavaliers credit cards

The virtual tour of Son Doong Cave by National Geographic

Good reads on Business

Semi-Annual Letter to Partners by the DMZ Partners Investment Management. It contains some great nuggets of wisdom with regard to investment and business

Next Act for Apple Veteran Ron Johnson Is Taking Home-Delivery Startup Public. Ron Johnson’s story is proof that even established names can fail. After making his name at Apple, you can argue that he failed at J.C Penney. Now he is working on another startup poised to go public via SPAC. I have to admit, though, that his startup doesn’t sound really exciting or appealing to me.

Bob Iger’s Long Goodbye. “The thing about Hollywood is, you can behave badly, you can be rude, you can make duds, but the thing you cannot do is fuck with people’s money,” says a producer with business at Disney. “You just don’t do that and hide behind technology as the reason why.” It’s really hard to come to a conclusion on whether Chapek is the right person for the job. In his defense, he was dealt with a very bad hand: his predecessor is one of the best CEOs the world has ever seen and his reign started with Covid-19. However, I am not pleased with his handling of the legal scuffle with Scarlett Johansson. That, along with the departures of key creative executives, shows that people’s skepticism of how he works with Hollywood is not entirely imaginary.

Disney’s shift to streaming puts ESPN in awkward position of clinging to the past. “ESPN probably won’t consider a direct-to-consumer service until the pay-TV bundle falls below 50 million U.S. households, according to people familiar with the company’s plans. Disney makes more money from cable subscribers than any other company, and that’s solely because of ESPN. ESPN and sister network ESPN2 charge nearly $10 per month combined, according to research firm Kagan, a unit of S&P Global Market Intelligence. The reverse is true for ESPN. Swapping an ESPN subscriber for an ESPN+ customer, who contributes average revenue of less than $5 per month, is a significant loss for Disney. ESPN+ is a streaming service with limited content.”

The Nasty Logistics of Returning Your Too-Small Pants. “The average brick-and-mortar store has a return rate in the single digits, but online, the average rate is somewhere between 15 and 30 percent. That kind of fraud accounts for 5 to 10 percent of returns. Many retailers don’t allow any opened product to be resold as new. Brick-and-mortar stores have sometimes skirted that policy; products that are returned directly to the place where they were sold can be deemed close enough to new and sold again. But even if mailed-in products come back in pristine, unused condition—say, because you ordered two sizes of the same bra and the first one you tried on fit fine—the odds that things returned to a sorting facility will simply be transferred to that business’s inventory aren’t great, and in some cases, they’re virtually zero.”

Amazon copied products and rigged search results to promote its own brands, documents show. “The documents reveal how Amazon’s private-brands team in India secretly exploited internal data from Amazon.in to copy products sold by other companies, and then offered them on its platform. The employees also stoked sales of Amazon private-brand products by rigging Amazon’s search results so that the company’s products would appear, as one 2016 strategy report for India put it, “in the first 2 or three … search results” when customers were shopping on Amazon.in.” The fact that they mine sellers’ data and offer their own private labels isn’t new in the retail world. What I suspect will get Amazon into trouble with lawmakers is the rigging of search results.

EA Sports Is Planning for a FIFA Without FIFA. “Sales of the game, which releases an updated edition every year, have surpassed $20 billion over the past two decades for its California-based maker, Electronic Arts. But FIFA has cashed in as well: Its licensing agreement has grown to become the organization’s single-most valuable commercial agreement, now worth about $150 million per year.”

All That Zaz: With Warner Bros. Discovery Merger, David Zaslav Is Angling to Become America’s King of Content. “I asked him before he had to jump off our Zoom for a parade of meetings with producers and agents and talent and other Hollywood folk. Is there yet another megadeal up his sleeve? Will Warner Bros. Discovery need to get bigger still? “I think this deal will be the first sentence of my obituary,” he said, “that Discovery merged into Warner.” And the second sentence? “It soared.”

After a year of missteps, Ikea’s e-commerce business appears to be heading in the right direction. You may think that retailers naturally realize the value of eCommerce and the role that physical stores can play in the fulfillment game. In reality, it takes a once-in-a-generation pandemic for retailers to come to terms with this point. IKEA is one of them. As big and iconic as they are

Other interesting stuff

This 24-year-old dropped out of Columbia to build a $140 million underwear brand. Another example of the American dream right there

Love, Hope, and Worry in Drought-Ridden Page, Arizona

GreenForges digs deep to farm underground. ““I stumbled upon a paper that was analyzing how much food production capacity can we do in cities using rooftop greenhouses,” he said. “It’s a relatively low number; we’re talking 2 to 5% range for the cities of 2050. No one was asking the question, ‘Can we grow underground?’”.

Stats

As of October 2021, only 5% of Twitch users made more than $1,000 in 2021

Thailand has 28 million daily digital transactions as of October 2021, up from 7 million in 2019 and 14.5 million in 2020

“There are over 50 million retirees in the United States and, by 2035, there will be 72 million retirees”

One single mobile device infected with malware costs an organization an average of nearly $10,000, per Apple.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.