Weekly readings – 22nd February 2020

The Merits of Bottoms Up Investing

I admit that I was initially fond of Lambda, but there has been growing coverage of the challenges that the startup faces and of what the company really is about. Here is one of the most damning articles: THE HIGH COST OF A FREE CODING BOOTCAMP

The Ride-Hail Utopia That Got Stuck in Traffic

Student debt in the US reached $1.6 trillion, yet graduates are having the hardest time ever to find employment

Unemployment among Americans aged between 22 and 27 who recently earned a Bachelor’s degree or higher was 3.9% in December — about 0.3 percentage point above the rate for all workers.

Source: Bloomberg

What Can the Stock Market Tell Us About the T-Mobile/Sprint Merger?

In light of the Coronavirus, here is how WHO advises us to wear a mask

Masayoshi Son and SoftBank struck again, this time with Oyo. Given the magnitude of capital involved, it’s incredulous to read this kind of shocking articles.

There were missteps at Oyo from the start. The Japan hotel team, led by a transplant from India named Prasun Choudhary, figured they could get to as many as 75,000 rooms in the first year, which would put them ahead of the Apa Hotels chain in the No. 1 spot. But they took as their starting point an inflated addressable market of 1.6 million rooms based on numbers from the local tourism authority: They included campgrounds, bed-and-breakfasts and pay-by-the-hour love hotels, which weren’t part of Oyo’s business plan, according to people involved at the time.

Oyo Life, the apartment rentals business led by another Indian lieutenant called Kavikrut (who like many Indians goes by one name), set the goal of 1 million rooms in part because it was a stunning, round number that would exceed the capacity of the Japan market leader, the people said. That was the target that caught Son’s attention in March.

The unpredictable economics of pawn shops

An interesting report by PwC on the consumer preference in the streaming battle

An interesting read on a software startup that helps coffee farmers

How Saudi Arabia Infiltrated Twitter

a16z compiled a report on Top 100 Marketplace startups

What is the proper way to drink whisky?

How to write usefully

An amazing piece of innovation from F1 Mercedes team that is an immensely ominous sign for their rivals

Weekly readings – 15th February 2020

An interesting piece on Lyft vs Uber

An argument for the challenges that Google is facing

This is what a hearing should be. Not the kind that has taken place lately

Spotify is evolving

Oklahoma State’s new identity. In my opinion, the new logo doesn’t look bad at all

This article sheds some light on the secretive S team at Amazon

The government’s revenue depends significantly on the tax receipts from citizens and corporations. So the revenue projection depends much on the assumptions of economic growth which seem too optimistic. It’s important to take into account the feasibility of these assumptions; which the media may not capture fully or an average citizen cares enough about

Weekly readings – 1st Feb 2020

This post is a little bit late since I have been sick the whole weekend

The decade of the very poor and the super rich

A good read on marketplace and under-utilized assets

How the Dutch Use Architecture to Feed the World. I didn’t know that Netherlands is the second biggest exporter of agricultural products in the world.

Uber tests letting drivers set their own prices. I never thought Uber would, one day, let drivers set up their own price, but apparently they seem to be experimenting on it. I wonder whether Lyft will follow suit and whether this development will pave the way for aspirational startups.

I am very disgusted and disappointed by Southwest. After all the consequences that Boeing has had to face in the aftermath of Boeing 737 Max, Southwest still doesn’t learn the lesson. I hope they will soon

Southwest pilots flew more than 17 million passengers on planes with unconfirmed maintenance records over roughly two years, and in 2019 smashed both wingtips of a jet on a runway while repeatedly trying to land amid gale-force winds, according to the Transportation Department report, reviewed by The Wall Street Journal.

Source: WSJ

An Electronic Heath Records system provider worked with a drugmaker to implicitly encourage more opioid prescriptions to patients, despite an alarming rate of deaths by overdose.

Groundwork for the deal between the companies began in 2013, according to the statement of facts agreed to by Practice Fusion under a deferred prosecution agreement. The idea was to get the opioid maker’s pain drugs to certain kinds of patients: ones who weren’t taking opioids, or those being prescribed the company’s less profitable products. It also aimed to secure longer prescriptions, according to the court papers.

Source: Bloomberg

Weekly readings – 25th Jan 2020

The Case Against Huawei

America’s new favorite restaurants are Wawa, Sheetz and 7-Eleven. It’s interesting to see a shift in the behavior of consumers who prefer not walking around in big stores or driving to a fast food restaurant.

Why it only costs $10k to ‘own’ a Chick-fil-A franchise

Why Japan is so successful at returning lost property

A concerning piece on Bumble, its toxic culture and a CEO that doesn’t inspire a whole lot of confidence

From the darling of fast fashion to bankruptcy: the tale of Forever 21’s demise. This should be the perfect case study for inadequate management, failing leadership and inability to adapt to the changing environment.

The State of Mobile in 2020. App Annie 2020 Report

The SaaS Marketing Bible [41+ Strategies & Case-Studies]. Certainly some good bits of information in there

How Ghent, a city in Belgium, inspired Birmingham to encourage more pubic transit usage

“[A city’s] best car plan is a bike plan,” he said. “Providing more space for walking and cycling leads not only to more people walking and cycling, it also makes space for people who really need to use their cars.”

The Guardian

Ethiopia Pushes Privatization to Give Its Economy a Sugar Rush

Source: DuckDuckGo

An excellent ads by Apple

Weekly readings – 11th January 2020

Commission-free investing with Vanguard. Introduced by a…vanguard like Robinhood and adopted by others like TD-Ameritrade or E-Trade, commission-free trading is now available with Vanguard as well

Analyst, analyze yourself

The environmental impact of today’s transport types

How to lose a monopoly: Microsoft, IBM and anti-trust

Cities Struggle to Boost Ridership With ‘Uber for Transit’ Schemes

How a plant saved a Japanese island