Weekly reading – 14th August 2021

What I wrote last week

I wrote about Square’s acquisition of Afterpay

Business

In the Streaming Wars, Sony Stands on the Sidelines. I think for the short term, it makes sense for Sony to adopt a zig-when-everyone-else-zags strategy as building a streaming service is not Sony’s strength. Of course, no strategy is risk-free. If the big streamers can create content on their own and don’t need Sony any more, the iconic Japanese firm will be in deep trouble. It is a big bet from Sony, but as the market stands today, I don’t think the company has too many options left.

Rappi’s poor service opens the door for competition, but users aren’t leaving yet. Two things from this article struck me: 1/ even though they were horrible incidents with services and customer support, there hasn’t been a customer exodus from Rappi yet. 2/ RappiPay is the most profitable and fastest growing part of the company. If the challenging delivery gig doesn’t work out for the company, it can pivot to be a full blown fintech.

Amazon’s $1.5 billion air cargo hub starts operations. In the arms race to compete with other retailers or eCommerce platforms like Shopify, solidifying or even adding to their advantage in infrastructure and last-mile delivery is the right move for Amazon. Just look at the price tag of the cargo hub. If anyone wants to compete with Amazon on this front, that’s at least what they should expect to spend. And it’s a tall order for many companies. With that being said, having another cargo hub doesn’t guarantee success, so it will be interesting to follow this market in the near future.

Excerpt: How Google bought Android—according to folks in the room. The founders of Google, especially Larry, do seem to have excellent foresight in acquiring Android. I look forward to this book.

What I found interesting

John Gruber’s excellent post on Apple’s new “Child Safety” measures. The nuances and details laid out by John are very enlightening and important in understanding what Apple is doing here.

Reality has a surprising amount of detail. The devil is in the details

Archaeologists discover 4,000-year-old ancient city in Iraqi desert. Imagine you see now something that existed 4,000 years ago. That must be a surreal feeling.

Believing In Yourself is Overrated. This is Better. I am not really a fan of the “fake it till you make it” mentality. So I am very glad that Ryan Holiday wrote about it since he is far more eloquent than I can ever be. In short, the more effort you put in something, the more confident you are in yourself

Stats that may interest you

Momo has 60% of Vietnam’s mobile payments market

Amazon has 11% of the U.S ads market

Amazon spent $6.2 billion on video and music content in the first 6 months of 2021. To put it in perspective, Netflix spent a tad lower than $8 billion on content in the same period

Weekly reading – 7th August 2021

What I wrote last week

I wrote about why credit card issuers should try to get into consumer digital wallets

Business

Pearson bets on direct-to-student subscription shift. I am never a fan of publishers like Pearson for a simple reason: books are murderously expensive in the U.S. In addition to the sky-high tuition fees, students have to pay easily a few hundred dollars or a thousand dollars a semester for books alone. There are ways to go around that challenge, but sometimes these guys work with professors and students are left with no choice, but to make a big splash on books. Pearson seems to be aware of the unsustainability of their current model. By going straight to students, they can establish a direct relationship and avoid relying too much on educational institutions. $15/month means students can pay $75/semester for access to all the books required. However, there are other publishers on the market. If students must get books from multiple sources, it can dilute the appeal of this new service from Pearson. I really look forward to seeing how this strategic move will pan out in the future.

Apple Is Now an Antifragile Company. A nice article on how shrewd Apple is when it comes to securing its chip supply while other struggle. I feel that not enough has been said about what a great job Apple’s management team has been doing. It takes a great deal of discipline to use billions of cash wisely quarter after quarter. The executives also have the foresight to develop their own chip M1 to keep more control of their fate and avoid being in the mercy of Intel. Additionally, the decision to make forward orders in bulk in advance has proven to superior. While others cite the struggle with chip supply as the reason for their relative subdued performance, Apple still posted strong results.

Music labels split over Spotify’s push to promote songs for lower royalties. I haven’t used the Discovery Mode yet, so I don’t know what it is like. I did have a less than stellar experience with the Spotify app; which I haven’t used for a long time. It’s not user-friendly at all. And if what is reported in the article is true, as a shareholder, I’ll be very disappointed. Sacrificing the user experience and the integrity of an algorithm like that over lower royalties and higher margin isn’t in the long-term best interest for the company, in my view.

Disney, WarnerMedia and NBCUniversal wrestle with balancing the value of cable networks and streaming services. I don’t think streaming is the best place for a newcomer with one cash cow to enter. The likes of Apple can arrive late at the part and compete because they have enormous resources and streaming isn’t their top 5 or 7 revenue stream.

The Verge interview with YouTube Chief Product Officer.

5 charts show Amazon’s growing logistics network as it puts inventory closer to consumers. Some great data and information, but I don’t think Amazon is playing the same game as Walmart. Operating huge stores with a lot of SKUs is not Amazon’s strength, at least compared to Walmart, for now. I don’t think it’s wise for Amazon to get into that arena. What I think Amazon is plowing money into is the last mile delivery. If groceries are what needs delivering, they are building out Amazon Go shops and can leverage Whole Foods footprint. However, if we are talking about non-grocery items, then Amazon is taking a very different approach to Walmart and staying at what Amazon has been great at: an online store with great customer services and unrivaled last-mile delivery network

What I found interesting

U.S. generates more plastic trash than any other nation. The amount of plastic bags in supermarkets in the U.S such as Target or Walmart staggered me. I don’t understand why they don’t implement policies that encourage shoppers to bring their own bags or boxes like Aldi does. At Aldi, you have to bring your own bag unless you are willing to pay for one every single time. I don’t think shoppers are bothered by that. If the likes of Target and Walmart can join the fight against unnecessary use of plastic, it’ll be a huge step forward given the reach and size of these retailers.

London’s Crossrail Is a $21 Billion Test of Virtual Modeling. Technology is mind-blowing. So is human imagination

Stats that may interest you

Luggage sales are up more than 460% year over year (Q1 2021)  on Amazon while swimwear sales have more than doubled year over year as of March and April 2021

From 2006 to 2021 per-capita volume consumption of juice and nectars in the U.S. declined 36%

Weekly reading – 31st July 2021

What I wrote last week

I wrote down a few thoughts on Netflix

Business

A great Business Breakdown episode on Petco. If you are not too familiar with the company or the pet supply industry, it’ll be worth your one hour.

Singapore Airlines Doubles Down on the E-Commerce Trend by Carriers. “In November, Singapore Airlines [SIA] CEO Choon Phong Goh described Pelago during an investor call as “a brand new business that’s been set up within SIA” with a goal of “extending the SIA experience from the skies to the ground. While airlines have upsold passengers on extras for years, what’s new is the hands-on approach to sourcing and marketing the content instead of using affiliate deals.”

Beijing orders Tencent to end exclusive music licensing deals in a first for the country. I am very reluctant to invest in Chinese companies precisely because of this.

Finance Chiefs Are Still Trying to Replace Excel With New Tools. Excel is a very powerful tool and we are not completely working without it at least in the next two decades. However, the over-reliance on Excel is damaging in a sense that it prevents companies from upgrading internal tools that can provide better collaboration and data interoperability. I am speaking from experience because that’s one of my personal frustrations at work.

How Gap’s new loyalty program ties together its multiple brands. I visited both Gap and Banana Republic recently. I couldn’t recall a nice experience in terms of finding out information about the rewards program. I suspect it is due to the staggered roll-out of the new rewards program and Omaha, Nebraska isn’t high on the priority list. Nonetheless, consolidating multiple rewards programs, making it simple for customer to understand and offering real values sound like music to my ear. Their offerings are still not best in class. For their sake, I hope they continue to upgrade the rewards benefits.

Reebok got the better of Nike 30 years ago but fell into oblivion. This is the story of how Rebook’s fall from grace happened. The article put a lot of emphasis on Adidas’ mismanagement of Reebook. That happens all the time. Executives promise the sun and moon in M&A, but failures are more common than many care to admit. I don’t know whether without Adidas, Reebok would have still been able to compete with Nike. That’s far from certain. Anyway, another business case study that many can draw lessons from.

Apple makes its M1 Mac case to enterprises. One of my bull cases for Apple is its potential in the enterprise market. Apple’s hardware is well-positioned to really attack this. Up to now, I don’t see a whole lot reported on its market share or Apple’s concrete strategy to go into this space. There is a lot of TAM to tap into here.

A nice profile piece on Bessemer Venture Partners. I like them because they seem very grounded, thoughtful and prudent with other people’s money. There are some firms that, in my opinion, tend to be too optimistic, to the point of being delusional in some deals. Plus, Bessemer publishes their investment memos that I like to read a lot. You can still be wildly successful while being different from the majority.

What I found interesting

Finland ends homelessness and provides shelter for all in need. Some food for thoughts for folks in America: is having the richest companies and individuals along side with grave inequality represented by a lot of homeless people better than a bit less wealth yet greater equality? As a reminder, Finland’s GDP Per Capita is higher than America’s

World’s cheapest energy storage will be an iron-air battery. The startup claimed that their revolutionary battery would cost only 1/10 as much as lithium batteries do. If that’s true, it will be huge.

Beneath Istanbul, Archaeologists Explore An Ancient City’s Byzantine Basements

What growing avocados in Sicily tells us about climate change and the future of food. Simply both fascinating and scary at the same time, if you ask me

Stats that may interest you

In 2020, craft brewers in the U.S produced around 23.1 million barrels, the lowest quantity in the last five years

Apple TV+ has 3% market share

Weekly reading – 24th July 2021

What I wrote last week

My review of From Junk To Gold

Business

An excerpt from an upcoming book on what went wrong with WeWork. This should be talked about in business schools as one of the examples of why egos and delusional ambition can lead to disasters. These guys are richer than many many people on Earth and have more money than most folks can earn in a lifetime. Nonetheless, it’s staggering to see their silly actions.

The Verge has an interesting interview with Mark Zuckerberg. The interview touches upon a lot of things but there are two that I want to quickly highlight here. Mark talks about how people shouldn’t expect that there is no transgression on his company’s platforms. That is always bound to happen. Instead, what people should expect is that Facebook is there to police the platform when it happens and puts in place integrity systems to deter bad demeanor. Secondly, I think the idea of interoperability is great, but not 100% perfect. That’s just how it is in life. There are always advantages and disadvantages to everything. Apple’s business model doesn’t involve interoperability that these guys advocate for, but in terms of net benefits to the society, has Apple been a positive force? I’d say so.

If you are not familiar with BNPL market, here is a good BNPL industry report

FICO Score’s Hold on the Credit Market Is Slipping. Not great news for the parent company of FICO score.

Grab taps Adyen to extend BNPL offering across Southeast Asia

What I found interesting

Master’s Degrees Are the Second Biggest Scam in Higher Education. My experience is that Master’s Degrees often still hold values because hiring companies value them. There are some exceptional programs that are worth the investment, but many aren’t. It’s crazy to think that so many people got into a huge debt to get something that is far less valuable

Giant tsunami from dino-killing asteroid impact revealed in fossilized ‘megaripples’. I can’t even bring myself to imagine what a 1-mile high tsunami looks like. It’s simply impossibly terrifying.

Lost world revealed by human, Neanderthal relics washed up on North Sea beaches

Stats that may interest you

20% of Americans think the U.S government uses Covid-vaccines to plant a microchip in their bodies. Use this info however you want

Lifetime emissions for an EV in Europe are between 66 and 69 percent lower compared to that of a gas-guzzling vehicle, the analysis found. In the US, an EV produces between 60 to 68 percent fewer emissions. In China, which uses more coal, an EV results in between 37 to 45 percent fewer emissions. In India, it’s between 19 to 34 percent lower.

Source: The Verge

Weekly reading – 7/17/2021

What I wrote last week

A strong debut weekend of Black Widow highlights Disney’s competitiveness

Business

The Verge did a great comparison of smart trackers from Apple, Samsung and Tile. Tile is really in a bind here. Its products are not substantially better than the others, to the extent that can justify the inferior network of trackers that Apple and Samsung can boast. Unfortunately, that’s the one thing that makes these trackers valuable in the first place

Facebook Users Said No to Tracking. Now Advertisers are Panicking. There seems to be a genuine angst from developers and advertisers over Apps Transparency Tracking (ATT). The thing is that when it comes to tracking, the interests of developers and consumers aren’t necessarily aligned. In that case, Apple has to pick a side and it decided to side with consumers; which is an understandable decision for two reasons: 1/ it’s what Apple has always been about and 2/ Consumers are ultimately their source of income and profit. Sure enough, it’s in Apple’s interest to have a great relationship with developers. But when it comes to the list of top reasons why Apple exists, I don’t think assisting all developers for free is anywhere near the top. The whole situation seems like when oil companies complain about governments’ policies that curb oil extraction in order to protect everyone else.

Inside Facebook’s Data Wars. When you allow misinformation to spread frictionlessly, it’s kinda hard to convince others that you are not an echo chamber of misinformation

Dara Khosrowshahi, Dad of Silicon Valley

Profile of Melanie Perkins, Co-founder and CEO of Canva

What I found interesting

Lewis Hamilton: ‘Everything I’d suppressed came up – I had to speak out’

Is a Graduate Degree Worth the Debt? Check It Here. The debate over whether a university degree is worth the financial investment is very nuanced and it’s not just about the money. However, it’s undeniable that what one can learn from the Internet for much less money increasingly puts in the spotlight the high tuition fees and all the nonsensical charges that schools levy on students

Alcohol Use Linked To Over 740,000 Cancer Cases Last Year, New Study Says

Stats that may interest you

Since 1928, every S&P500’s bull market cycle lasted more than 1,100 days on average while that of a bear market cycle averaged 207 days

Engineers in Japan reached the new record for Internet speed at 319 Terabits per second, two times faster than the previous record

Edge_Retail_Insight-top_global_food_retailers-channels.png
Source: Supermarketnews

Weekly reading – 7/10/2021

What I wrote last week

I wrote about Clear Secure, which just recently went public

Business

Japan launches bid to regain its semiconductor crown. “Japan’s plans are less about boosting output than about avoiding being caught in the crosshairs of global tensions, notably the fierce competition between the US and China for dominance of future technologies.” It will be hard to play catch-up in the semiconductor industry, but I wouldn’t rule out Japan.

Starting April 22, 2022, Visa will lower interchange rates for Card-Not-Present tokenized transactions and increase rates for some Card-Not-Present untokenized ones. In layman’s terms, it means that merchants will get to keep more money (maximum 10 basis points) if they encourage customers to pay online with mobile wallets such as Apple Pay or PayPal. Nothing spurs actions like incentives.

Universal films will head exclusively to Amazon Prime Video after their run on Peacock. Amazon has been aggressively investing in content on Prime Video. First it secured rights to stream NFL Thursday games starting next year. Then, it bought MGM Studios. Now, it will bring over Universal films after the initial premiere on Peacock. Amazon has been on the record pleased with Prime Video as an acquisition and retention tool for their lucrative Prime customer base. The Prime customer base in the US, since streaming rights are geographically dependent anyway, should be big enough to justify Amazon’s outlay.

FACT SHEET: Executive Order on Promoting Competition in the American Economy. I like what I saw from this Executive Order. I hope that the responsible Departments will soon introduce and implement policies. I, for one, would love to have another Internet provider in my building, in addition to Cox

Didi Tried Balancing Pressure From China and Investors. It Satisfied Neither. “The regulators in Beijing were under the impression Didi would pause its initial public offering while it addressed data-security concerns, according to people familiar with the company’s conversations with regulators. In New York, Didi offered assurances that Beijing had given it the green light, said people close to the listing process.”. It sounds like Didi wasn’t honest and straightforward with investors; which you know is a crime. On a side note, unless somebody lives in China or really understand what goes on in the country, for the life of me, I don’t understand why they will invest in Chinese companies. Just look at Didi and Alibaba as examples.

What I found interesting

The Senator Who Decided to Tell the Truth. I’d have a beer with this Senator. As a GOP politician, he was brave to tell the uncomfortable truth when his constituents didn’t want that truth. Whether you agree with his report, we definitely need more truth-telling and honest people like McBroom

A new road to an inaccessible land. An awesome write-up on the highly remote Wakhan Corridor in Afghanistan. The area looks pristine and beautiful. I love this kind of exploratory pieces that can educate people on places that they would not hear about

Steve Jobs in Kyoto. Just a beautiful story on Steve Jobs. He made the world a better place and was gone too soon. But he is still an inspiration to many now and in the future.

Casualties of Perfection. “If your job is to be creative and think through a tough problem, then time spent wandering around a park or aimlessly lounging on a couch might be your most valuable hours. A little inefficiency is wonderful.”

Hands-on: How to edit PDFs with iPhone and iPad in the iOS 15 Files app

It’s Official. We Can Now Harvest Usable Lithium From Seawater. The science is there. The experiments were tried. I now look forward to the implementation in the real world. If we can get lithium from seawater and inexpensively, that’ll be a major plus for the world

A short movie on Japan

Stats that may interest you

Cleaner air has contributed one-fifth of U.S. maize and soybean yield gains since 1999

Apple stores 8 million TBs on Google Cloud

The number of mobile wallets in use worldwide is expected to reach 4.8 billion in 2025, up from 2.8 billion in 2020

Fincog Overview of BNPL Providers, Ranked by Size
Source: Fintechnews

Weekly reading – 3rd July 2021

What I wrote last week

My thoughts on why investing is hard

Business

Credit Suisse 2021 Report on Payments, Processors & Fintech. This deck is long and has tons of information. You can get a lot of pointers out of it, but be aware that many slides have quite old data.

The economics of dollar stores. An excellent post by The Hustle on how dollar stores work. The most interesting things to me are 1/ unit prices on some items at these stores can be higher than those at bigger chains such as Target or Walmart. The absolute prices are lower, but they are also on a much smaller volume. 2/ These stores seem to be more concentrated in poorer neighborhoods. I read somewhere that richer customers don’t mind the stigma of buying stuff at dollar stores. I wonder if that’s still true and how much the trend is a boost to these stores’ business.

How a Beer Giant Manages Through Waves of Covid Around the World. A great story of how a global business uses data analytics to make decisions in the tumultuous pandemic. Even when the AB Inbev’s data team accurately predicted the second surge in India, it did get the previous predictions wrong. Nobody has a crystal ball to see the future. All we can do is to increase the odds with a wealth of data and machine computing.

Mac sales in India tripled after online Apple Store opened. One aspect of Apple’s business that I think should be discussed more is its retail stores and website. The report here credited the presence of Apple’s website for the significant increase in sales. I also learned from the article that to launch own-brand eCommerce sites in India, companies need to source locally 30% of their production. I guess there is a side benefit of expanding supply chain in India, apart from lowering the risk of over-reliance on China.

What does MongoDB do?

An interesting article on the next CEO of Amazon, Andy Sassy. The level of detail orientation described in the article is admirable. I love the concept of the Wheel of Death. People naturally tend to get complacent. Having them on their toes and preserving the unpredictability is a great way to ensure that they perform to the level required.

What I found interesting

Inside Wikipedia’s endless war over the coronavirus lab leak theory. Content moderation is super difficult at scale. Especially when you are widely considered to be neutral and often accurate. And during a global pandemic.

Equipping cargo ships with puffy sails could help Michelin improve a vessel’s fuel efficiency by 20%

The 5 coolest trends in urbanism … in Europe

Stats that may interest you

U.S online grocery sales hit $7 billion in May 2021, just a bit higher than the figure in March 2020, right before Covid

1/3 of U.S grocery sales comes from independent supermarkets

1 out of 3 men in the U.S reported to have fewer than 2 close friends, excluding relatives, according to a survey in May 2021

According to Bain, Covid increased the forecast online sales as % of all grocery sales in the US in 2025 from 8% to 13%

Average Prime Day order in 2021 was $47.14, down from $54.64 and $58.91 in 2020 and 2019 respectively

Amazon Pay Later hit 2 million sign-ups in India

97% of customer auto purchases in the U.S involves online research, but auto eCommerce only makes up 1%

Weekly reading – 26th June 2021

What I wrote last week

A great podcast episode on Formula One as a business

Business

The World Relies on One Chip Maker in Taiwan, Leaving Everyone Vulnerable. The whole tech industry relies so much on TSMC and the story is likely to continue in the near future. It’s expensive and time-consuming for other countries to build anything that can compete with TSMC. On the other hand, this puts TSMC in an awkward position where it has to deftly navigate the complex political conflicts between superpowers.

Shop Pay available to all businesses on Facebook and Google. I think Shopify is trying to do two things here with this move: 1/ it’s trying to use Shop Pay as an acquisition tool. By making the checkout option available to even non-Shopify merchants on Facebook and Google, it is hoping that the tool can lure these merchants into selling on their platform. 2/ Obviously, this is going to also help Shopify increase revenue. Even though Shopify’s GMV has grown seriously in the last few years, GMV of non-Shopify merchants should be a lot bigger. Taking a slice of every non-Shopify transaction can be a lucrative business

Amazon labels millions of unsold products for destruction, new investigation finds. Lately there have been way too many articles that shed light on distasteful aspects of Amazon, from unbearable waste to unacceptable treatment of its worker. I have to admit that even though I am a fan of the business as I learned a lot from its story and I am a shareholder, I am strongly considering selling it as it’s just not comfortable any more.

A timeline of Google’s attempts at building a messaging app. The fact that you may be more familiar with Zoom, Teams or Slack should tell you a lot about how successful these attempts have been. Nonetheless, it doesn’t mean that they won’t succeed, ever.

Facebook officially launched audio rooms and podcasts in the U.S. Facebook is an extremely fast follower that is quite often deadly and effective at scaling what others made known. How they are going to make these new features will be interesting. I mean I am not an active Facebook user and neither are most of the people in my circle. Who will use these features to create content? Will celebrities and people that have a following choose to host their content on Facebook? Especially given that they should already have a home on either Twitter or Clubhouse? One big advantage that Facebook has over Twitter and especially Clubhouse is that it is much more famous and the network effect is easier to scale.

This one email explains Apple. The article does a good job of fleshing out a very interesting email exchange that could well be the foundation of the App Store

What I found interesting

Incredible 15th-Century Japanese Technique for Growing Ultra-Straight Cedar Trees. I love Japan and its culture. This is just one of the many many reasons.

Adobe launched tools to create 3D

Marc Andreessen just had a very interesting interview recently. In response to the question of what advice he would give to a 23-year-old, here is what he had to say

Don’t follow your passion. Seriously. Don’t follow your passion. Your passion is likely more dumb and useless than anything else. Your passion should be your hobby, not your work. Do it in your spare time.

Instead, at work, seek to contribute. Find the hottest, most vibrant part of the economy you can and figure out how you can contribute best and most. Make yourself of value to the people around you, to your customers and coworkers, and try to increase that value every day.

It can sometimes feel that all the exciting things have already happened, that the frontier is closed, that we’re at the end of technological history and there’s nothing left to do but maintain what already exists. This is just a failure of imagination. In fact, the opposite is true. We’re surrounding by rotting incumbents that will all need to be replaced by new technologies. Let’s get on it.

Source: Interview with Marc Andreessen by Noah Opinion

Stats that may interest you

The average age of vehicles in the U.S was 12.1 years in 2020

Shops, Facebook’s equivalent to Shopify, has 300 million monthly visitors and over 1.2 million monthly active Shops

DuckDuckGo has been downloaded 50 million times over the last 12 months and it has been profitable since 2014

Weekly reading – 19th June 2021

What I wrote last week

A study that revealed people preferred an electric shock to being left alone with their own thoughts

Some interesting comments from Walt Disney CEO on the business

Business

How Ondo’s Customers Using Shop Pay Installments Are Spending 2x More Than Regular Customers. The concept of BNPL isn’t new. What is interesting is that it is now adopted for stuff like socks.

Apple admits why its own Files app was ranked first when users searched for competitor Dropbox. Not a good look for Apple. It does seem that the top brass at the company didn’t know about this issue at all and once the issue was revealed, it was opposed. However, the thing about being the top brass is that you have to take responsible for what your direct reports do.

An interesting presentation on Mistakes of Omission. If you are into investing, this presentation can be very thought-provoking. One of the things that I keep thinking about is whether I am paying too much for a business and whether I unnecessarily increase my average price. I haven’t invested for a long time, but so far, most of my biggest winners happen when I decided to increase my average

A look inside Google’s first store. I hope that Google will use these stores as a showroom to demonstrate to the end users the awesome features it releases every year. Yes, the company isn’t known for making great hardware like Apple is, but the stores’ functionality doesn’t need to be restricted to hardware only. They can be a place to bolster customer relationships and educate end users on a variety of Google services. How many Google features do you not know? How many do you actually know about but haven’t used because they all seem abstract and complex at first glance?

PayPal lowers their rates for U.S merchants on Visa/Mastercard transactions and raised rates for their own products. This is quite a bold move to compete with Stripe, Square and Authorize.net as well as to clearly showcase their position. PayPal is confident enough in the appeal of their own offerings that they think a rate hike is justified. Recently, PayPal has been very aggressive on multiple fronts: engaging merchants and acquiring new users. I got multiple offers from PayPal and Venmo recently from $5 to download the app, $10 to reactivate my Venmo account or $10 to refer a friend.

A couple of interesting posts by CNBC on Roku here and here. I am not working at Roku, so I don’t know what the culture is like. Even if I knew what it was like, it would still be difficult to make a generalization as a culture works for many but doesn’t for others. Still an interesting case study

What I found interesting

I saw millions compromise their Facebook accounts to fuel fake engagement

This is a story about a Japanese diplomat who courageously defied his own government to save hundreds of Jews decades ago. I had never heard of Chiune Sugihara. I am glad that I did this week

I am not a fan of the New York Times nor am I a subscriber. But this investigative piece on the train crash in Mexico City is excellent

Senate passed a bill that would make it easier for folks to unsubscribe online. What can I say? Long overdue. One of the things that rarely come out of the Senate. All those subscription services, especially newspapers outlets, should feel ashamed of themselves for making it overly difficult for consumers to unsubscribe. I hope they will make this kind of shenanigan illegal.

When you are keenly aware of your own struggles but blind to others’, it’s easy to assume you’re missing some skill or secret that others have.

When someone is viewed as more extraordinary than they are, you’re more likely to overvalue their opinion on things they have no special talent in.

Everyone’s dealing with problems they don’t advertise, at least until you get to know them well. Keep that in mind and you become more forgiving – to yourself and others.

Source: Harder Than It Looks, Not As Fun as It Seems

Stats that may interest you

The price of lumber in the US shot up by 377% last year

40% of elementary students in Vietnam are obese, according to the latest survey by the Ministry of Health

Weekly reading – 5th June 2021

Business

Sweetgreen Bet Big on Naomi Osaka. Then It Doubled Down. As the world becomes more divided nowadays, celebrity endorsements come with a risk that companies have to make uncomfortable decisions at times. This is one of those moments for Sweetgreen and personally I am happy that they support Osaka.

Self-Driving Cars Could Be Decades Away, No Matter What Elon Musk Said. If a company or an executive claims that their company’s bright future relies on self-driving cars, take it with a big grain of salt and ask a lot of questions because that future is highly uncertain and can be decades away.

Apple’s new App Store guidelines put scammers and bounty hunters on notice. Apple just did themselves and almost everyone else a favor by being more detailed and specific about their App Store guidelines. A major criticism of Apple and the App Store is that their guidelines are too ambiguous and not enforced equally. That’s a fair criticism and since Apple wants to hold a complete unchallenged power over the App Store, they can’t expect that we expect nothing, but perfect from them. I doubt this latest development will quell much the frustration by developers, but it’s a positive step in the right direction

An interesting chat between Kara Swisher and Margrethe Vestager on issues such as a global tax, court cases against big techs and potential remedies towards the oversized dominance of the likes of Apple.

Netflix debuted an online shop that sells merchandise related to their hit shows such as Lupin. This is a natural extension of their business. When some of their shows are fan favorites and garner enough following, why not capitalizing on such popularity? After all, that’s what Disney does. You watch Marvel or Disney movies and visit the theme parks for other experiences. I don’t think this is so much about being on level terms with Disney. Instead, this is about generating more margin and revenue.

What I found interesting

Jordan, Russell, Kareem, even the King of Pop — the astonishing mentors who shaped Kobe Bryant. Everyone wants to be like Kobe, but are they ready for the sacrifices and solidarity like Kobe was? Are they willing to go above and beyond for their obsession like Kobe?

Eddy Cue On Why Spatial Audio Is a Game-Changer

Shedding More Light on How Instagram Works. According to this post from Instagram, it uses a lot of data (they call it “signals”) to determine what content you get to see. There are two sides of this. On one side, it can be convenient and good that you get to see more of what you like. On the other hand, it means that Instagram or Facebook knows a lot about you. Had Facebook had a better track record in terms of privacy in the past, it wouldn’t have been a concern. The reality is that I am not sure users really use Facebook’s platforms because they are trustworthy. It’s likely because Facebook owns the biggest platforms in the world and users only use them out of convenience. Nonetheless, appreciate posts like this one

The World’s Northernmost Town Is Changing Dramatically

How the wealthiest in America avoid paying income taxes

In 2011, a year in which his wealth held roughly steady at $18 billion, Bezos filed a tax return reporting he lost money — his income that year was more than offset by investment losses. What’s more, because, according to the tax law, he made so little, he even claimed and received a $4,000 tax credit for his children.

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